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  1. #1
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    Unhappy Help with a lesson plan

    HI i REALLLY NEED HELP HERE. I HAVE DONE THIS TWICE NOW AND I KEEP GETTING A FAIL. THESE ARE THE COMMENTS I GOT. CAN ANYONE HELP GET GET ON THE RIGHT TRACK?

    Comment: In the instructions you are asked to state the objective for the lesson. The Target Language, the assumed knowledge, anticipated problems, solutions to those problems and preparations and aids. You were also asked to show timing and interaction. Please go over your plan and indicate these. Also it is not clear how you actually warm up the lesson, what step you take next. You need to show the stages of your plan very clearly. Otherwise the content seems to be okay, I just feel it is drifting without clear focus.


    Look at the student’s profile below:

    Level: Pre-intermediate, has been learning English for 2 years
    Age: 26
    Job: Pilot
    Interests: Action movies, extreme sports, rock music, travelling
    Areas he wants to work on: Improving speaking skills and grammar (especially the tenses)
    Needs English for: Working on international flights, meeting with foreign colleagues, socialising, writing e-mails, telephoning.

    Learner style: Visual

    Based on the information above, write a lesson plan for a 45 minute lesson for this student. Remind yourself of the rules of lesson planning and include the following information:

    Objective
    Target language
    Assumed knowledge
    Anticipated problems
    Solutions
    Preparations and aids

    Then write a step-by-step lesson plan including timing and interaction for each stage.

    My Answer:


    TARGET STRUCTURE: Reading and Discussion
    VOCABULARY: Airplanes / Travel
    LEVEL: Advanced
    TIME: 1 hour, depending on discussion
    SUGGESTED TEACHING METHOD
    This example covers vocabulary, reading and discussion practice. Travel and flying are good topics for the student, and should provoke interesting discussion among student and the lecture.


    This one on one exercise can also be used and augmented for VIP, One on One or even small classrooms. This worksheet is aimed to provoke interesting in discussion with either the teacher or even in among students. The student will read over the worksheet and discussing their answers. This module will help re-introduce the vocabulary work as a scanning exercise, asking the student to look for the words in the text and underline them before proceeding further. Ask them not to treat the work sheet like a bus timetable – (you look for a specific time, rather than read the timetable from top to bottom.)

    Before the student reads the text, explain the reading task. This will encourage the student to read quickly and make brief notes in the table and then they should then with you to see if there is any misunderstanding. If there is than you should go through the answers with the student. This would also be the time to deal with any pressing vocabulary questions.


    This exercise recycles vocabulary and helps the student focus. The student should work alone, but check with you if there are any underlining misconceptions. When going through the answers, accept anything that is natural English, leaving plenty of time for discussion later. Students should read all the questions first, before beginning the discussion. The encouragement of eye contact is important with any follow-up questions. Some discussion phrases might also come in useful.







    MODULE 1: A QUICK QUIZ HOW MUCH DO YOU KNOW ABOUT FLYING?

    Circle the correct answer:

    • When was the Wright Brothers’ first flight? 1901 1903 1911 1912
    • When was the first non-stop flight between NY and Paris 1912 1927 1932 1951
    • When was Concorde’s first commercial flight? 1976 1981 1988 1991


    MODULE 2: VOCABULARY #1 MATCH THE WORD WITH ITS CORRECT MEANING.

    • Initially (adv) to trust someone or something to do what is required
    • The norm something that is possible (often for plans)
    • Classy (adj) stylish and fashionable
    • Rely (v) unwilling to do something
    • Relieve (v) to make a pain or problem less bad
    • Feasible (adj) at the start of a plan, process or situation
    • Reluctant (adj) the usual way of doing something


    MODULE 3: READING QUICKLY READ THE FOLLOWING TEXT:

    1. You might think that being a pilot would come high on the list of most dream jobs, free air travel, a good salary, the sex-appeal and no queues at passport control. Yet before we rush out to learn how to fly, will airlines of the future still need pilots? Computer-operated planes are already being used by the United States military for reconnaissance. The unpiloted plane, like so much technology initially developed by the military, could one day be used for commercial purposes. Indeed, some airline experts say that pilotless planes could be the norm for commercial flights by 2030.

    2. Pilotless passenger planes would have numerous advantages. Employing pilots isn’t cheap: most senior captains earn between $180,000 and $250,000 a year, overnight stays between flights at classy hotels add more costs, and airlines have to operate costly roster systems to avoid pilot fatigue. Commercial flights already rely on auto-pilot for landings in bad weather and to relieve pilots on long flights. Pilotless planes can fly higher and longer than manned flights and are easily operated – on-board computers handle the take-off, flight and landing. A fully automated passenger plane, while expensive to develop, is technically feasible and would save airlines billion’s every year and make air-travel cheaper.

    3. Making unpiloted planes commercially viable would ultimately mean convincing the public. More than half of all air-travel deaths are due to human error, but believing unmanned planes would be completely error-free is naïve – think how many times computers crash. Most people would feel uneasy if they knew their plane was being flown unpiloted. Perhaps we just instinctively prefer fellow humans to machines.

    4. Passengers may feel less reluctant once other forms of automated travel become more common. Most of us take automated elevators and monorails without thinking of any possible safety issues. Many cars have cruise-control and driverless trains are becoming widespread. Should problems occur during a flight, having an on-board stand-by pilot or controlling a plane via remote control might ease doubts.

    5. Will we all be flying in pilotless planes in the future? Perhaps the idea of cheaper fares will encourage people to keep flying, regardless of whom or what is controlling the plane.




    MODULE 4: SUMMARIZING WRITE ONE SENTENCE FOR EACH PARAGRAPH.

    1)
    2)
    3)
    4)
    5)


    Module 5: Vocabulary #2 Change words in these sentences using the vocabulary from exercise two.

    1. At first, Henry wanted to fly freight planes.
    2. That medicine you gave me certainly eased the pain.
    3. I can trust her to look after my children.
    4. Your business plan is not realistic.
    5. Surfing the Internet at work is very common at some companies!
    6. I am unwilling to get involved with this new project.

    Module 6: Discuss these questions. (Ask follow-up questions!)

    • Would you be willing take a pilotless flight, or be onboard and if so why or why not?
    • Why did you want to be a pilot?
    • Have you ever had any bad experiences on flights?
    • What machines do you rely on at home or at work? How often do they go wrong?



    Comment: In the instructions you are asked to state the objective for the lesson. The Target Language, the assumed knowledge, anticipated problems, solutions to those problems and preparations and aids. You were also asked to show timing and interaction. Please go over your plan and indicate these. Also it is not clear how you actually warm up the lesson, what step you take next. You need to show the stages of your plan very clearly. Otherwise the content seems to be okay, I just feel it is drifting without clear focus.

  2. #2
    Tdol is online now Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: Help with a lesson plan

    One thing I think could be included is something to accommodate the learner's visual style of learning. It's predominantly text based, so couldn't you do something visual in the opening stage, maybe instead of the Wright brothers questions?

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