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  1. #1
    rigoberto Guest

    Exclamation Idiomatic expression

    I'm sorry I would like you help me to understand an idiomatic expression or I think that it is, I'm talking about I got and I've got I don't understand how I can use this

    Could you give me an explanation about to use it

    Thanks a lot

  2. #2
    Mister Micawber's Avatar
    Mister Micawber is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: Idiomatic expression

    These are not idiomatic expressions, Rigoberto, they are just two forms of the informal stative verb 'have got' = have. The first, 'I got' is substandard, and the second, 'I've got' is informal, for 'have' (= possess), as in these sentences:

    'I have a headache.'
    'I've got (have got) a headache.'
    X 'I got a headache.'

    The forms have other uses, however, as the past tense and present perfect tense for the active verb, 'to get':

    'I got a letter from my friend yesterday.'
    'I've got (BrE)/gotten (AmE) a letter from her every day this week.'

  3. #3
    welldone Guest

    Default Re: Idiomatic expression

    I am a bit confused here, too.
    I always hear/see sentences like this:

    I gotta go.

    according to some dictionary, 'gotta'= 'have got to'

    Don't understand why people would say 'I have got to go'...Isn't that "present perfect"?

    thanks

  4. #4
    Mister Micawber's Avatar
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    Default Re: Idiomatic expression

    Now we are into a third form-- 'have got to'-- which is a modal idiom. It means 'must', in the sense of necessity or requirement. It is not present perfect; it only has two tenses (and three forms)-- have/has got to, had got to.

    'Gotta' is a common transcription of the casual pronunciation, which is usually pronounced with a 'flap-t' (= /d/), actually: /gadə/

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