Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
  1. #1
    Snappy is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    353
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Sentence structure "the + noun + in"

    1. Don't drink the water in the pond.
    In the above sentence, "the" before "water" is required because "the water" is restricted by the phrase "in the pond."
    If somebody has a water bottle and s/he attempts to drink some water in the bottle, however, I could say, "Don't drink water in the pond" as a warning, because it is cold in the pond and s/he might catch a cold. Please tell me if my understanding is correct.

    2. We are measuring the carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.
    I don't know if I should leave out "the" before "carbon" or either will do. I would like to hear native speakers opinion.

    I have had another question in the same sentence structure, i.e., "the + noun + in."



    I like life in the country side bettern than life in town.
    Do I need "the" before "life in the country" and "life in town"?


    Thank you in advance.
    Last edited by Snappy; 20-Oct-2009 at 20:09.

  2. #2
    pyoung is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    909
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Sentence structure "the + noun + in"

    Dear Snappy:

    Quote Originally Posted by Snappy View Post
    1. Don't drink the water in the pond.
    In the above sentence, "the" before "water" is required because "the water" is restricted by the phrase "in the pond."
    If somebody has a water bottle and s/he attempts to drink some water in the bottle, however, I could say, "Don't drink water in the pond" as a warning, because it is cold in the pond and s/he might catch a cold. Please tell me if my understanding is correct.
    I'm not sure how the bottled water fits into this, so I may not understand your question well, but:
    If I heard someone say,
    "Don't drink water in the pond", I might interpret it to mean, 'Don't drink water while you are in the pond.'
    If the person said, 'Don't drink water from the pond,' I would assume that, for some reason I shouldn't drink any water from this pond.

    2. We are measuring the carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.
    I don't know if I should leave out "the" before "carbon" or either will do. I would like to hear native speakers opinion. Unless there is some reason having to do with your experiment, I think either one will do. In order to avoid the problem, one could say, 'We are measuring atmospheric carbon dioxide.'

    I have had another question in the same sentence structure, i.e., "the + noun + in."



    I like life in the countryside (all one word) better than life in town.
    You could also say, 'I like life in the country better than life in town. Here 'the country is understood to stand in opposition to 'town.'
    Do I need "the" before "life in the countryside" and "life in town"?
    Yes. 'The countryside' is understood to mean a rural area. However, 'Countryside life is better than town life.'
    'Countryside picnics are a great pleasure.'
    and
    'Country living is my favorite.'


    Thank you in advance.
    I hope this is helpful,

    Petra

  3. #3
    Snappy is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    353
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Sentence structure "the + noun + in"

    Thank you Petra. I understood everything. In question 3, however, what I wanted to ask is why there is no "the" before "life"

    "I like life in the country side better than life in town."
    vs.
    "I like the life in the country side better than the life in town."

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    2
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Sentence structure "the + noun + in"

    Thank you Petra. I understood everything. In question 3, however, what I wanted to ask is why there is no "the" before "life"

    "I like life in the country side better than life in town."
    vs.
    "I like the life in the country side better than the life in town."


    --I am impressed by your efforts at "fine-tuning" your English, Snappy!--
    --My response would be:
    country vs. Country (it is possible that "rural" could be confused with "a nation")
    so, from the original saying:
    "I like life in the countryside (all one word) better than life in town."
    Option 1: I prefer the countryside to living in town.
    Option 2: I prefer the slower pace of life outside of town.

    "Countryside" is often used to describe a beautiful setting...a beautiful place that you see (from a car or bus or train--while touring)...or experience as a visitor (not a resident).
    So...living (or life in) the countryside is not a common phrase where I live in the USA (it might be more common in the U.K., Ireland, etc.)

  5. #5
    Ann1977 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1,131
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Sentence structure "the + noun + in"

    Quote Originally Posted by drpaultravel View Post
    Thank you Petra. I understood everything. In question 3, however, what I wanted to ask is why there is no "the" before "life"

    "I like life in the country side better than life in town."
    vs.
    "I like the life in the country side better than the life in town."


    --I am impressed by your efforts at "fine-tuning" your English, Snappy!--
    --My response would be:
    country vs. Country (it is possible that "rural" could be confused with "a nation")
    so, from the original saying:
    "I like life in the countryside (all one word) better than life in town."
    Option 1: I prefer the countryside to living in town.
    Option 2: I prefer the slower pace of life outside of town.

    "Countryside" is often used to describe a beautiful setting...a beautiful place that you see (from a car or bus or train--while touring)...or experience as a visitor (not a resident).
    So...living (or life in) the countryside is not a common phrase where I live in the USA (it might be more common in the U.K., Ireland, etc.)
    Petra, the asker wants to know why we don't say

    I like the life in the countryside better than the life in town.

    I was dying to see the answer!

    I think we might say

    I like the life of the countryside better than the life of the town.

    How come. Petra???

  6. #6
    pyoung is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    909
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Sentence structure "the + noun + in"

    Dear Snappy:

    Quote Originally Posted by Snappy View Post
    Thank you Petra. I understood everything. In question 3, however, what I wanted to ask is why there is no "the" before "life"

    "I like life in the country side better than life in town."
    vs.
    "I like the life in the country side better than the life in town."
    Either one is correct.

    'I like life in the countryside,' would generally refer to one's own experience of time spent in the countryside. It might also be expressed as, 'I enjoy spending time in the countryside.'

    'I like the life in the countryside,' means essentially the same thing, but may imply a less direct knowledge of this life. One might say, 'I just got back from a visit to my sister's farm. Although the work is hard, the daily routine is simple and her family is very happy there. I like the life in the countryside.'

    All best wishes,

    Petra

  7. #7
    Snappy is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    353
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Sentence structure "the + noun + in"

    An English dictionary published in Japan says "the" is required before "water" in the sentence "Don't drink the water in the pond," because it is restricted by the restrictive clause "in the pond."
    This description confused me.
    Now I understand that "the" is required before "water," otherwise the sentence becomes vague.


    Let me reconfirm.


    1. "Don't drink water in the pond." This sentence is a little vague because "water" does not clearly mean "the pond water."
    2. Don't drink water from the pond." This sentence is clear enough, and people would think "water" refers to "the pond water."


    Then the following sentence is possible as a notice or warning to visitors to the pond, and "the" before "fish" is not required because the notice does not refer to any particular type of fish (just any fish in the pond.).


    "Don't catch fish in the pond."


    Am I correct?

  8. #8
    Ann1977 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1,131
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Sentence structure "the + noun + in"

    Quote Originally Posted by Snappy View Post
    An English dictionary published in Japan says "the" is required before "water" in the sentence "Don't drink the water in the pond," because it is restricted by the restrictive clause "in the pond."
    This description confused me.
    Now I understand that "the" is required before "water," otherwise the sentence becomes vague.


    Let me reconfirm.


    1. "Don't drink water in the pond." This sentence is a little vague because "water" does not clearly mean "the pond water."
    2. Don't drink water from the pond." This sentence is clear enough, and people would think "water" refers to "the pond water."


    Then the following sentence is possible as a notice or warning to visitors to the pond, and "the" before "fish" is not required because the notice does not refer to any particular type of fish (just any fish in the pond.).


    "Don't catch fish in the pond."


    Am I correct?
    I think "Don't catch fish in the pond" is clear enough, yet I'm pretty sure the sign would say "Don't catch the fish in the pond."

    "Don't eat the fish from the pond" is quite specific compared to "Don't eat fish from ponds."

    But there is so little difference between "Don't eat fish from the pond" and "Don't eat the fish from the pond" that if you showed a native speaker a sign with one of these sentences, and then 30 minutes later showed him the other, he would agree that you showed him the same sign both times.

  9. #9
    Snappy is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    353
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Sentence structure "the + noun + in"

    The sentence structure "the + noun + in" still confuses me.

    What is the difference in meaning between the following sentences?

    1. People in Osaka are friendly.
    2. The people in Osaka are friendly.

  10. #10
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    22,677
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Sentence structure "the + noun + in"

    Quote Originally Posted by Snappy View Post
    The sentence structure "the + noun + in" still confuses me.

    What is the difference in meaning between the following sentences?

    1. People in Osaka are friendly.
    2. The people in Osaka are friendly.
    There is no difference in meaning.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. [General] I Don't Understand The Structure Of This Sentence...
    By VividJailbird in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 13-Mar-2009, 17:12
  2. pyramid structure of sentence
    By ohmyrichard in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02-Nov-2008, 01:19
  3. Plural Noun in an asking sentence
    By scottwoolard2 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 15-Oct-2007, 20:50
  4. Sentence structure question...
    By Super Sonic in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 08-Jul-2007, 21:18
  5. Sentence type, grammatical structure
    By tangroberta in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-Jan-2007, 09:14

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •