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Thread: Gerund


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    #1

    Gerund

    What are the most usual way of describing the gerund?
    The following sentences are given in my text book, so they should be correct:
    I was frightened by his sudden appearance.
    I was frightened by his opening the door so suddenly.
    Having studied these two exmaples, I think that you can use both an adjective and an adverb after the gerund. Am I right?

    Which of these three sentences is correct?
    1. What about putting up a fence around our country cottage? I知 sick and tired of our neighbours constant looking at what we do!
    2. What about putting up a fence around our country cottage? I知 sick and tired of our neighbours looking at what we do constantly!
    3. What about putting up a fence around our country cottage? I知 sick and tired of the fact that our neighbours constantly look at what we do.
    I think the last sentence would look more natural if I said - the fact that our neighbours are always looking at what we do. Right?

  1. Bolo
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    #2

    Re: Gerund

    Teachers,

    After having read the post above, which seems to be inetresting ,as it touches a couple of grammar issues (not only adjactives and adverbes but also word order and tenses),
    I came up with my version of the sentence. Let's say version no. 4.

    Would it be possible to put this way:

    4. What about putting up a fence around our country cottage? I知 sick and tired of our neighbours constantly looking at what we're doing!

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    #3

    Re: Gerund

    The following sentences are given in my text book, so they should be correct:
    I was frightened by his sudden appearance. I can't see a gerund here.
    I was frightened by his opening the door so suddenly.


    1. What about putting up a fence around our country cottage? I知 sick and tired of our neighbours constantly looking at what we do!
    2. What about putting up a fence around our country cottage? I知 sick and tired of our neighbours looking at what we do constantly!
    3. What about putting up a fence around our country cottage? I知 sick and tired of the fact that our neighbours constantly look at what we do.

    I think the last sentence would look more natural if I said - the fact that our neighbours are always looking at what we do. Right? Right


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    #4

    Re: Gerund

    I was frightened by his sudden appearance. I can't see a gerund here.
    You're right - there's no gerund in the first sentence. I just made a mistake. Thank you very much for correcting the other three sentences

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #5

    Re: Gerund

    Quote Originally Posted by Bolo
    Teachers,
    After having read the post above, which seems to be interesting ,as it touches on a couple of grammar issues (not only adjectives and adverbs but also word order and tenses), I came up with my version of the sentence. Let's say version no. 4. Would it be possible to put this way:

    4. What about putting up a fence around our country cottage? I知 sick and tired of our neighbours constantly looking at what we're doing!
    Welcome, Bolo.

    4. is fine.

  3. Bolo
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    #6

    Re: Gerund

    Thanks Cas,

    I'd be grateful for explaining to me the difference in use of Present Simple and Simple Continuous in the last part of the disscused sentence.

    The part: .....looking at what we do/looking at what we are doing.

    Is there any difference in meaning? Do they emphasize something different?
    Does it depend on circumstances?

    Thanks


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    #7

    Re: Gerund

    To be honest, I also wanted to ask this question. While writing these sentences I thought that I probably should use the continious tense. I don't really know the rule which explains when you should use the continious tense and why

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    #8

    Re: Gerund

    I'd say it gives more emphasis to the spying.


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    #9

    Re: Gerund

    Everyone concerned with the spying -
    Quote - 4. What about putting up a fence around our country cottage? I知 sick and tired of our neighbours constantly looking at what we're doing!

    Isn't "looking" here a gerund? Because of the preposition "of" earlier in the sentence? "Sick and tired of ... looking"


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    #10

    Re: Gerund

    Sorry - misread the question, I'll go back to bed!

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