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    Default pronunciation for the past simple/past participle

    if the 'ed' ending follows a voiced consonant, such as /v/ or /m/ or /g/, it is pronounced /d/
    if the 'ed' ending follows an unvoiced consonant, such as /f/ or / / or /k/, it is pronounced /t/
    if the 'ed' ending follows /d/ or /t/, it is pronounced /Id/


    can anyone show me an example how i could describe how i would teach these rules to a class of elementary learners who are being taught the past simple regular forms.

    i have to include examples, i.e. a complete list (lists) of words i will present to your students.

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    Default Re: pronunciation for the past simple/past participle

    Quote Originally Posted by tonyheaney View Post
    if the 'ed' ending follows a voiced consonant, such as /v/ or /m/ or /g/, it is pronounced /d/
    if the 'ed' ending follows an unvoiced consonant, such as /f/ or / / or /k/, it is pronounced /t/
    if the 'ed' ending follows /d/ or /t/, it is pronounced /Id/


    can anyone show me an example how i could describe how i would teach these rules to a class of elementary learners who are being taught the past simple regular forms.

    i have to include examples, i.e. a complete list (lists) of words i will present to your students.
    Check these links, they should provide you a clear picture on how to teach the ed pronunciation to your students...

    Simple Past Tense Pronunciation

    Pronunciation of past simple verbs | Teaching English | British Council | BBC

    English Pronunciation: How to Pronounce -ed in English | EnglishClub.com

    Simple Past - Pronunciation of the ending -ed

    Pronunciation - The final ed sound of the simple past tense of regular English verbs - e Learn English Language

  3. #3
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    Default Re: pronunciation for the past simple/past participle

    Quote Originally Posted by tonyheaney View Post
    if the 'ed' ending follows a voiced consonant, such as /v/ or /m/ or /g/, it is pronounced /d/
    if the 'ed' ending follows an unvoiced consonant, such as /f/ or / / or /k/, it is pronounced /t/
    if the 'ed' ending follows /d/ or /t/, it is pronounced /Id/


    can anyone show me an example how i could describe how i would teach these rules to a class of elementary learners who are being taught the past simple regular forms.

    i have to include examples, i.e. a complete list (lists) of words i will present to your students.
    To be more complete, I would add this:

    p, f, k, sh, ch, s - If the verb ends with one of these sounds, then "ed" is pronounced like a "t". These are unvoiced consonant sounds.

    t, d - If the verb ends with t and d, then "ed" is pronounced like this "əd".

    Any other sound that a regular verb ends with is pronounced like "d". All of these sounds are voiced consonants.

    Use easy-to-understand verbs such as "walk" or "talk". Demonstrate the pronunciation using simple example sentences.

    It's probably easy to go online and find a list of common regular verbs if it's difficult or inconvenient to think of verbs on your own. I happen to have a rather long list of common regular verbs, which I modified from a list I found online some time ago. Write short dialogs. I wouldn't teach a pronunciation lesson like this using isolated words. Just think of everyday situations, and write short texts or short dialogs.

    Here's an example:

    Where did you go?
    I walked to the store.
    What did you get?
    I just picked up some bread and eggs. (picked up - This could be too advanced, but it's an example anyway.)

    Did Carol work today?
    Yes, she worked today.
    Did you talk to her?
    Yes, I talked to her.
    Is she working tomorrow too?
    No, she said she asked for Sunday off because she's going away for a couple days.
    She called me, but she didn't leave a message.
    Oh, yes, she did. She wanted to talk to you before she finished work.


    This document would be helpful in order to show how "ed" sounds like "t". It's particularly useful because it demonstrates how "t" and "d" sounds are lost when they are followed by another "t" or "d", or a similar sound, such as "th". Here's an example, "We finished the job at 10:00".

    final ed

    ed linking.pdf- same document - from this page Pronunciation Pages (The ESL EFL Pages ) at this site www.esleflpages.com
    Last edited by PROESL; 21-Oct-2009 at 21:53.

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