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  1. #1
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    Default Is T in water pronounced the same as the one in city?(American English)

    I can pronounce the T in (water, matter, letter ...etc) properly, but I can' pronounce it in other words like city.
    Is the tongue movement different? or do I need to be super fast to pronounce it? (I can pronounce it if say it slowly)

  2. #2
    Raymott's Avatar
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    Default Re: Is T in water pronounced the same as the one in city?(American English)

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    I can pronounce the T in (water, matter, letter ...etc) properly, but I can' pronounce it in other words like city.
    Is the tongue movement different? or do I need to be super fast to pronounce it? (I can pronounce it if say it slowly)
    It's pronounced the same.
    You should try to work out where the problem is coming from - the first syllable or the second. That is, is the interference coming from before or after the /t/?

    If you can say 'settee, batty, putty', then the problem is coming from the /it/ part.
    If you can say 'sitter, bitter,' but not 'sitting', then the problem is coming from the /ti:/ combination.

    You need to define further what combinations you're having trouble with.
    Is it just /iti:/ ?

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Is T in water pronounced the same as the one in city?(American English)

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    I can pronounce the T in (water, matter, letter ...etc) properly, but I can' pronounce it in other words like city.
    Is the tongue movement different? or do I need to be super fast to pronounce it? (I can pronounce it if say it slowly)
    In American Accent, you may hear 2 types of /t/ sounds: True T sound (city) and Flapped T sound (water, butter, latter). And sometimes the /t/ sound is not pronounced at all, for example in words like Interview, Internet, Advantage, etc

    The flapped T sounds like a soft /d/ sound. Flapped T sound is heard when the T does not fall in the stressed syllable of the word (Natalie)

    The true T sounds like a normal /t/ sound and it is heard when the T comes in the stressed syllable of the word (Matilda).

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    Default Re: Is T in water pronounced the same as the one in city?(American English)

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    In American Accent, you may hear 2 types of /t/ sounds: True T sound (city) and Flapped T sound (water, butter, latter). And sometimes the /t/ sound is not pronounced at all, for example in words like Interview, Internet, Advantage, etc

    The flapped T sounds like a soft /d/ sound. Flapped T sound is heard when the T does not fall in the stressed syllable of the word (Natalie)

    The true T sounds like a normal /t/ sound and it is heard when the T comes in the stressed syllable of the word (Matilda).
    That's true in a sense, but I was assuming the poster wanted to speak English to be understood. No matter how some Americans speak, saying "innerview" with a foreign accent is less likely to get you understood in America than saying "interview" with a foreign accent.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Is T in water pronounced the same as the one in city?(American English)

    I know of 4 American T sounds: True /t/ "tiny" (though it is less wet than the RP homologue); a final clipped T sound, which is pre-plosive: "bit"; the softened T, almost a /d/: "better" and a plosive (windy) T sound: "bottle." Only a minority of people differentiate between the last two, however, most preferring the /d/-like t.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Is T in water pronounced the same as the one in city?(American English)

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    I know of 4 American T sounds: True /t/ "tiny" (though it is less wet than the RP homologue); a final clipped T sound, which is pre-plosive: "bit"; the softened T, almost a /d/: "better" and a plosive (windy) T sound: "bottle." Only a minority of people differentiate between the last two, however, most preferring the /d/-like t.
    What do you mean by "less wet"?
    What do you understand by "wetness" in a sound?

    Thanks

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Is T in water pronounced the same as the one in city?(American English)

    Less pressure, lower frequency, longer wavelength, less like a sibilant.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Is T in water pronounced the same as the one in city?(American English)

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    Less pressure, lower frequency, longer wavelength, less like a sibilant.
    So does it also carries a "hissing" sound as sibilants do?

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Is T in water pronounced the same as the one in city?(American English)

    No, but we would find the British /t/ in city has a slight hiss, compared to ours, though the difference is not significant.

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