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  1. #11
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: Dangling Modifiers and Combining

    Quote Originally Posted by the killer View Post
    hello
    Are these correct?
    1.you sould be ready to pitch the camp , because the windstorm will hit the camp.
    2-The convicts did not yield , they thought they could attract the support of the press.
    3-After their house was burned to the ground, the Welches had to build a new house.


    thanks for all
    1. Remember to start your sentences with a capital letter.
    2. Don't leave a space before your punctuation mark.
    3. Your first sentence is okay, but repeating "the camp" is redundant. You might want to say "soon" or something like that.
    4. This is a comma splice - you have joined two sentences with a comma and that's wrong. (I never saw the problem with this one in the original.)
    5. Your third sentence is fine - you could say "burned" and not "was burned."

  2. #12
    jlinger is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Dangling Modifiers and Combining

    You are doing much better.
    The only problem is with number 2. Here you have two complete sentences, joined with a period / full stop.
    The convicts did not yield , they thought they could attract the support of the press.
    Each phrase is a complete sentence because it has its own subject and verb:
    a. Convicts / did not yield
    b. They / thought

    Therefore, you should either use a full stop / period OR a semicolon - but NOT a comma:

    The convicts did not yield ; they thought they could attract the support of the press.
    - or -
    The convicts did not yield. They thought they could attract the support of the press.

    I think you are finally understanding the issue of dangling modifiers, however!

  3. #13
    the killer is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Dangling Modifiers and Combining

    thank for your helping.

  4. #14
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    Nannou is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Dangling Modifiers and Combining

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    1. Remember to start your sentences with a capital letter.
    2. Don't leave a space before your punctuation mark.
    3. Your first sentence is okay, but repeating "the camp" is redundant. You might want to say "soon" or something like that.
    4. This is a comma splice - you have joined two sentences with a comma and that's wrong. (I never saw the problem with this one in the original.)
    5. Your third sentence is fine - you could say "burned" and not "was burned."
    Could you explain please, why he couldn't use "was burned" because I was thinking that it is correct to use the passive voice in this 5th sentence.
    Thanks in advance
    Last edited by Nannou; 05-Nov-2009 at 00:29.

  5. #15
    Barb_D's Avatar
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    Default Re: Dangling Modifiers and Combining

    Both are possible.

    If you say it "was burned" to the ground, it sounds intentional. As you say, it's passive.

    The arsonists burned the house to the ground. The house was burned to the ground [by the arsonists].

    If you simply it "it burned" there is no sense of why the house burned. It could have been struck by lightening, had a candle tip over by accident, a wiring short, etc. It's intransitive. No one burned it. It just burned.

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