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  1. #1
    Abstract Idea is offline Key Member
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    Default verb formation vs noun

    "I reminded the men in the audience that being a father meant more than fathering a child." (B. Obama - The Audacity of Hope)

    I used to think the fact that English verbs do not have a specific suffix ending was something terrible and awkward, let us say like an imperfection of the English language. But now I begin to think exactly the opposite, as I see almost any noun can be made to a verb in English. In fact, thinking quickly, I cannot remember an English noun wich is not itself a verb, or can be made to. For me it was hard to believe such a common noun as father can also be a verb. That is indeed a strong advantage of English compared to other languages.


    If you are an ESL/EFL student, I advise you to pay attention to this important fact. Whenever you look up a noun in a dictionary, observe its possibly usage also as a verb.


    PS Feel free to correct any mistakes in this post.

  2. #2
    sarat_106 is offline Key Member
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    Exclamation Re: verb formation vs noun

    Quote Originally Posted by ymnisky View Post
    "I reminded the men in the audience that being a father meant more than fathering a child." (B. Obama - The Audacity of Hope)

    I used to think the fact that English verbs do not have a specific suffix ending was something terrible and awkward, let us say like an imperfection of the English language. But now I begin to think exactly the opposite, as I see almost any noun can be made to a verb in English. In fact, thinking quickly, I cannot remember an English noun wich is not itself a verb, or can be made to. For me it was hard to believe such a common noun as father can also be a verb. That is indeed a strong advantage of English compared to other languages.


    If you are an ESL/EFL student, I advise you to pay attention to this important fact. Whenever you look up a noun in a dictionary, observe its possibly usage also as a verb.


    PS Feel free to correct any mistakes in this post.
    It is vice-versa. Some verbs can be also used as nouns; here are some to name a few: rest, debate, overflow
    The doctor advised her to have complete rest for one month.
    The boss is resting now, so do not disturb him.

  3. #3
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: verb formation vs noun

    Quote Originally Posted by sarat_106 View Post
    It is vice-versa. Some verbs can be also used as nouns; here are some to name a few: rest, debate, overflow
    The doctor advised her to have complete rest for one month.
    The boss is resting now, so do not disturb him.
    It's not really vice-versa. Verbing a noun is very popular these days, probably moreso than nouning verbs.

  4. #4
    Abstract Idea is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: verb formation vs noun

    Deciding whether it is versa-vice or vice-versa implies a careful language historical analysis - which came first, the chicken or the egg? But I guess Raymott is right.

    By the way, thanks for your direct and indirect (verbing, nouning) examples.

  5. #5
    Abstract Idea is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: verb formation vs noun

    Not only nouns!!

    "That was welcome news for the White House, as the president nears a decision on a revised strategy for Afghanistan that could include the deployment of tens of thousands of additional American troops."
    (Paula Wofson - VOA news)

    near
    v., neared, near∑ing, nears.
    v.tr. To come close or closer to.
    v.intr. To draw near or nearer; approach.

    Not only nouns, also adverbs and adjectives.

    English is really amazing!

  6. #6
    philo2009 is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: verb formation vs noun

    Quote Originally Posted by ymnisky View Post
    Not only nouns!!

    "That was welcome news for the White House, as the president nears a decision on a revised strategy for Afghanistan that could include the deployment of tens of thousands of additional American troops."
    (Paula Wofson - VOA news)

    near
    v., neared, near∑ing, nears.
    v.tr. To come close or closer to.
    v.intr. To draw near or nearer; approach.

    Not only nouns, also adverbs and adjectives.

    English is really amazing!
    Not really ever an intransitive verb, but if you wish to extend your list to include as many homomorphs of 'near' as possible, you could list it also as a preposition (near the door), an adverb (the time is drawing near), and an adjective (the near future)!

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