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Thread: Saying the date

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    #1

    Saying the date

    Hello,

    For quite a few years I have noticed that the Americans have their own incorrect way of saying the date, which makes me cringe every time I hear it.

    Have you noticed?

    They will say 'two thousand nine', instead of, 'two thousand AND nine'.
    Or
    October eighteen, 'instead of, 'October the eighteenth'.

    I hope I'm not just being petty, but every time I hear this I think ouch!

    JAG
    Last edited by Jaguar; 02-Nov-2009 at 17:36. Reason: spelling

  1. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Saying the date

    There are many correct ways to say and write dates. And correctness is normative, not based on any region's individuals. If that is a big concern of yours, then... the best o' British luck to you.

    Besides, the British military often use the forms you dislike.

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    #3

    Re: Saying the date

    Thanks.

    If the British military use it they do so to avoid confusing the allies.


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    #4

    Re: Saying the date

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaguar View Post
    Thanks.

    If the British military use it they do so to avoid confusing the allies.
    They do it because it is concise and in messages during battle conciseness is essential.

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    #5

    Re: Saying the date

    Yes, I agree with that, but I don't think there is any palce for it in correct spoken English.

    Thank you!

  2. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Saying the date

    Well the point, I think is that if the Americans have their own way of saying anything, it's not incorrect. You don't have the single-handed power to determine that, nor should you think of yourself as having that authority. What is normatively judged correct by the American community of English-speakers is correct in North America.

    By and large, what is correct here is also accepted in the UK as well. Why be narrow-minded? The problems you are complaining about are abbreviations and short-cuts, which the British do even more than we do.

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    #7

    Re: Saying the date

    Personally, I think this has got to do with the varieties of English(es) used by people in different regions. In the spoken context, any variety will do because the key is to get the message across instantly. In the formal context, you might want to use:

    2001 - two thousand and one
    1 Jan. - the first of January

    That's my two cents' worth :)

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    #8

    Re: Saying the date

    Quote Originally Posted by kevchua View Post
    Personally, I think this has got to do with the varieties of English(es) used by people in different regions. In the spoken context, any variety will do because the key is to get the message across instantly. In the formal context, you might want to use:

    2001 - two thousand and one
    1 Jan. - the first of January

    That's my two cents' worth :)
    What about the written context? And once it is written, how do you read it?
    See: http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/as...ing-dates.html

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    #9

    Re: Saying the date

    Quote Originally Posted by kevchua View Post
    Personally, I think this has got to do with the varieties of English(es) used by people in different regions.
    It does.

    _________________
    Glad to see you didn't get pulled into Jaguar's trolling net.


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    #10

    Re: Saying the date

    This is interesting because the other day, an announcer on radio (in Malaysia) was saying there is a new movie called "20", "12". What he was referring to was the movie "2012". Shouldn't the correct way to say it be: "two thousand and twelve"? We say this year is "two thousand and nine"; we don't say "20" "9".
    But by the same token, we say "19" "41"; we don't say "one thousand, nine hundred and forty-one". The same for any year in the past century.
    Maybe, it is a matter of time and we will get used to saying "20" "12" for 2012 once it becomes common usage.
    As long as we understand what the person is saying, I think it is ok. Times are changing and English will have keep up with it. Take an old and new dictionary and see the number of words where they are dropping the hyphens, for example. We have to simply keep up with the times.

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