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  1. #1
    Jennifer Nevsky is offline Junior Member
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    Default Is charm ing an absolute adjective?

    In class, we were working on adjectives. Why do we not say charmingier or charmiest? Is charm a participle. If so, do particles not have comparative and superlative degrees or are they always preceded by more or most? Jenny

  2. #2
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    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: Is charm ing an absolute adjective?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer Nevsky View Post
    In class, we were working on adjectives. Why do we not say charmingier or charmiest? Is charm a participle. If so, do particles not have comparative and superlative degrees or are they always preceded by more or most? Jenny
    "Charm" is both a noun and a verb, "charming" is an adjective the comparative for it is "more charming" and the superlative is "the most charming".

    That woman has a lot of charm (noun).
    That woman has charmed (past participle of the verb) me.
    She is a charming (adjective) woman.

  3. #3
    Jennifer Nevsky is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Is charm ing an absolute adjective?

    I thought the rules for use of er and est involves one or two syllable words. Charming is two syllables; therefore, it should be charmier or charmiest. Why is it more charming and most charming?

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    soutter is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Is charm ing an absolute adjective?

    Charming is not an absolute adjective.

    Absolute adjectives such as unique, perfect, impossible usually are not qualified with very or most. For example, I heard a CNN (shudder) announcer say that something was very impossible. Mr B Obama's book title, A more Perfect Union (deliberately recalling Lincoln's phrase) is logically nonsensical: one is either perfect or imperfect.

    Generally, use the comparative suffix -er and superlative suffix –est for one-syllable adjectives and for some two-syllable adjectives (usually those that are of a Germainc origin), notably those that end in -y or -le. Recent is an exception because generally English does not add the comparative and superlative (Germanic) suffix to (French) loan words.


    For adjectives that are formed from the present and past participle (of verbs, that is) always use more and most for the comparative and superlative forms and never the -er and –est suffixes, respectively.

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    Jennifer Nevsky is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Does the present and past participle always use more or most ?

    In class, we were discussing the use of more or most. Souter answered a query I had stating that with past and presesnt participles we use onl;y more or most in English. What about tireder? Is there no such a word. It shoudl be more tired? Is it a rule to use more or most instead of the suffix er or est with comparative and superlative forms?

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Does the present and past participle always use more or most ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer Nevsky View Post
    In class, we were discussing the use of more or most. Souter answered a query I had stating that with past and presesnt participles we use onl;y more or most in English. What about tireder? Is there no such a word. It shoudl be more tired? Is it a rule to use more or most instead of the suffix er or est with comparative and superlative forms?
    If you say that one syllable adjectives take "er" for the comparative and "est" for the superlative, and all adjectives of more than one syllable take "more" as comparative and "the most" as superlative is a rule, you will be right most of the time. "Tired" is an adjective which can be seen as one or two syllables so "the most tired" is ok in all situations and "tiredest" is ok in spoken English.

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    soutter is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Is charm ing an absolute adjective?

    Tireder is just bad English that the English (ha! I'm Scots) usually use. It should be more tired, most tired: it is an adjective formed from a past participle.

    I am always warning my Swiss French pupils to be on the watch for the bad English of the English (ha!).

    EG

    I have just catched (pardon? 's glaiket that - Good Scots)

    instead of

    I have just caught.

  8. #8
    bhaisahab's Avatar
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    Default Re: Is charm ing an absolute adjective?

    Join Date: May 2009
    Country: Britian


    I notice that the Scots can't spell Britain though. (I have Scottish and Irish ancestry).

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