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  1. #1
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    Default Does this sentence make sense?

    Hi does this sentence make sense?
    Her young hopes are extinct

  2. #2
    svartnik is offline Banned
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    Default Re: Does this sentence make sense?

    It does to me.

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    Barb_D's Avatar
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    Default Re: Does this sentence make sense?

    Yes, to me too.
    She is still young. She once had dreams and hopes. Something has happened to kill those dreams. She is still young, but without hope.

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    Searching for language is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Does this sentence make sense?

    It may make sense gramatically, but I don't think that anyone would normally speak that way.

    Her young hopes are gone.
    Her young hopes have been dashed.
    Her young hopes have been destroyed.
    Her young hopes have turned out to be an illusion.

    All of the above mean that the hopes are gone.

    I am not a teacher.

  5. #5
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    konungursvia is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: Does this sentence make sense?

    It sounds pretty bad to me: "young" usually implies living (we don't read about young corpses) and extinct applies to entire species that can no longer be revived (unlike hope).

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    Default Re: Does this sentence make sense?

    Quote Originally Posted by zerobit View Post
    Hi does this sentence make sense?
    Her young hopes are extinct
    I think it is better to say:
    Her younger hopes vanished.
    Vanished/dashed

  7. #7
    LuciFerum is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: Does this sentence make sense?

    Quote Originally Posted by zerobit View Post
    Hi does this sentence make sense?
    Her young hopes are extinct
    Reading it at first, I thought it referred to the hopes of her young, as in her children, and would say that the correct way to express that would be:

    Her young's hopes are extinct.

    However, after reading the responses I see what it was meant and believe that it is grammatically correct though confusing. I would have said:

    Her youthful hopes are extinct.

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    Barb_D's Avatar
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    Default Re: Does this sentence make sense?

    Y'all have no sense of the drama of a poetic remark. Or perhaps the poetry of a dramatic remark. How much more meaning the reader can infer with "extinct" - killed off one by one. You can practically write an entire short story from that one statement.

    The OP didn't ask "What is the most natural way to say this in conversation?" We were asked "Does it make sense?" Are you all suggesting it is nonsense, completely incomprehensible?

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    Default Re: Does this sentence make sense?

    Thanks for all replies and sorry for the delay

    I saw this sentence in a test, I couldn't work out what it was trying to say.

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    It sounds pretty bad to me: "young" usually implies living (we don't read about young corpses) and extinct applies to entire species that can no longer be revived (unlike hope).
    I agree, I've never seen extinct be used for abstract things such as hope.

    However after checking the dictionary I found these two:
    no longer in use; obsolete: an extinct custom.
    having ceased eruption; no longer active: an extinct volcano.

    So can extinct be used for things like hope, or not?

  10. #10
    konungursvia's Avatar
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    Talking Re: Does this sentence make sense?

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Y'all have no sense of the drama of a poetic remark. Or perhaps the poetry of a dramatic remark. How much more meaning the reader can infer with "extinct" - killed off one by one. You can practically write an entire short story from that one statement.

    The OP didn't ask "What is the most natural way to say this in conversation?" We were asked "Does it make sense?" Are you all suggesting it is nonsense, completely incomprehensible?
    Right, but I decided to distinguish between intelligibility (we get it) and clarity (this one is a strange sentence).

    I'd prefer something like....

    Her youthful hopes were obliterated.

    The reason being that I find it awkward to confuse an object and its properties, unless it really does sound poetic, like a synecdoche.

    I found "young hopes" a bit confused, like your own government's concept of "drug enforcement." ;) Is it she who is young? Is she old, but the hopes were freshly imagined?
    Last edited by konungursvia; 05-Nov-2009 at 19:07. Reason: added last sentence

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