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  1. #1
    Eureka is offline Junior Member
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    Smile Is there any particular term for "relative grading"?

    Hi, teachers

    I hope you have a good day. Here are my questions!

    1) When it comes to classroom assessment, isn't there any particular term
    for "relative grading or absoulte grading? I know some academic terms
    like norm-referenced or criterion-referenced evaluation.
    I'm so wondering if these academic terms are frequently used when
    teachers in middle or high schools explain grading or something.
    If not, can you tell me what term is natural for describing "absoulte
    and relative grading" in school field? Is it O.K to just say "absolute or
    relative evaluation rather than using acdemic terms above? I'm so
    confused how to tell my students.

    ex) "This Mid-term test will be on relative evaluation(absoulte evaluation)
    ". This is what I want to express but I'm sure of what I wrote. Can you
    correct it for me?


    2) Isn't there any difference between "wish" and "hope" in use? To
    me, hey are always interchaneable like below example.

    I wish you have a merry christmas.

    I hope you have a merry christmas.

    If I'm wrong, please correct me with examples.

    Thanks a million in advance.

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Is there any particular term for "relative grading"?

    I'm not sure if I understand question #1 correctly, but if I do, we call it "grading on the curve" in the US. That would be relative grading -- setting the grading scale so that each student's assessment is scored relative to those of the other students.

    As for #2, there is indeed a difference between wish and hope and the two are seldom interchangeable. In the example given, the correct choice is hope. However, you can say, "I wish you a Merry Christmas." In fact, a popular Christmas carol bears that sentence as a title (except it's we instead of I). Here, wish is used as the main verb, and bestows a greeting or good thoughts (wishes) upon someone.

    Hope is typically used for possible, real situations -- used to express a particular desire or outcome for a future situation. (I hope I do well on my test tomorrow!)

    Conversely, wish is usually used for imaginary, unreal, or past situations in which the outcome cannot be changed. We often use wish in second and third conditionals. It can also be used with a past perfect verb to express regret that a desired outcome was not realized. (I wish I had done well on my test yesterday!)

    The concepts of wish and hope are related, but the words are used differently.

  3. #3
    Eureka is offline Junior Member
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    Thumbs up Thank you so much

    I can't thank you enough for your great explanation. It really helps me

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