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  1. #1
    vil is offline VIP Member
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    Default loved to talk/loved speaking/love to hear

    Dear teachers,

    Here are one after another three sentences respectively by Dreiser, Thackeray and Wild.

    She loved to talk imposingly!
    She loved speaking romantically when there was an occasion.
    I love to hear Roberta talk about them.

    Would you be kind enough to explain to me the author’s choice for each one of the expressions in bold?

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.

  2. #2
    sarat_106 is offline Key Member
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    Exclamation Re: loved to talk/loved speaking/love to hear

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Here are one after another three sentences respectively by Dreiser, Thackeray and Wild.

    She loved to talk imposingly!
    She loved speaking romantically when there was an occasion.
    I love to hear Roberta talk about them.

    Would you be kind enough to explain to me the author’s choice for each one of the expressions in bold?

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    The verb love can take both an infinitive or a gerund as its object but with change in meaning.

    By use of infinitive in the first sentence, the adverb "imposingly" does not refer to 'love' but to how she talks.
    The second sentence has two clauses.
    1) She loved speaking romantically. Here speaking is the object of the verb love and the adverb modifies love. As: She romantically loved speaking
    2) when there was an occasion. Is a relative adverbial clause modifying adverb ‘romantically’.
    In the third sentence the infinitive to hear is the object of verb love and linked with an adverbial clause Roberta talk about them.

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