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  1. #1
    seungmin Guest

    Default The difference between under pressure 'to' and 'of'

    Hello everyone, I would like to thank for your consideration and help in advance.

    As the titles suggests, I did not see the clear distinction between

    'under pressure of' and 'under pressure to'.

    Naturally, I googled it to make the best guess for each of them, but the result was not that

    satisfacotry. I found that when it comes to the unit of measurement, such as pund, kg, etc,

    be under pressure of was used a lot, but at the same time I was able to find be under

    pressure used with verb+ing type.

    Please somebody clears this confusing problem so that I can stop buring my brain :)

  2. #2
    Soup's Avatar
    Soup is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: The difference between under pressure 'to' and 'of'

    Hello seungmin


    • be under pressure to do something
    • be under the pressure of something

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