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  1. #1
    navi tasan is offline Key Member
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    for

    1-I didn't buy that car from your dad for you to drive it.
    2-I didn't buy that car from your dad, for you to drive it.

    Don't these two sentences have different meanings?
    I think in 1, I did buy the car and I am saying my intention for buying it wasn't to let you drive it and in 2 I wanted you to drive it so I didn't buy it.
    Am I correct?

    Is the comma absolutely necessary if the second meaning is intended?
    Last edited by navi tasan; 09-Mar-2005 at 20:35.

  2. #2
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    Re: for

    Quote Originally Posted by navi tasan
    1-I didn't buy that car from your dad for you to drive it.
    2-I didn't buy that car from your dad, for you to drive it.

    Don't these two sentences have different meanings?
    I think in 1, I did buy the car and I am saying my intention for buying it wasn't to let you drive it and in 2 I wanted you to drive it so I didn't buy it.
    Am I correct?

    Is the comma absolutely necessary if the second meaning is intended?
    Again, I wouldn't put the comma myself. The idea being exactly the same as in your previous example. It doesn't bring anything new to your sentence, it doesn't change anything.

  3. #3
    navi tasan is offline Key Member
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    Re: for

    Thanks Marilyn,
    I am not sure about this but I think there might be a difference.

    A) I didn't buy that car from your father to have you drive it. (I bought it to drive it myself).

    B) In order for you to drive your dad's car, I didn't buy it from him. (I let him keep it so that you might drive it).


    I think 1 corresponds to A and 2 to B. In other words, in one case I did buy the car and in the other I didn't.

    The same goes for the "so that" question.

    Like I said, I may be wrong, but in that case either the sentence (the one without a comma, since the comma doesn't change a thing) is ambiguous or it can only mean either A or B.

    I think 2 corr

  4. #4
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    Re: for

    in one case I did buy the car and in the other I didn't.


    No, I don't think so, Navi. It's clear to me that in both sentences - comma or not - you did not buy the car. The word "for" is an essential part of the whole sentence and you can't separate these two parts.

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