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    #1

    Question Dangling participle

    In a book about academic writing I found this sentence:
    'Turning to the subject of variations within Britain, there are significant differences between regions.'
    Is this a good sentence or a dangling participle? How else could you put it?

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    #2

    Re: Dangling participle

    I wouldn't have caught it casually, but when you study it, I suppose it would be better phrased as, "Turning to the subject of variations within Britain, one notices significant differences..."

    When you see one of those -ing phrases, they should refer to the subject of the sentence.

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