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  1. #1
    infiniteone's Avatar
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    Default Questions about "There be" and "had been"

    I think "There had not been NOUN " is grammatic expression.
    But I have seen many writings used the expression, "There had been not NOUN"

    Can I use both of them?

    And I have two more questions.

    How do you thnik about these sentences : "There are no my books" , "There are no books of mine" , "There are not my books"
    I think that the second and third are well-formed.
    But, I am curious about the availability of the first.


    Lastly, what is the difference in meaning between "There is no my book" and "There are no my books" ?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Questions about "There be" and "had been"

    Quote Originally Posted by infiniteone View Post
    I think "There had not been NOUN " is grammatic expression.
    But I have seen many writings used the expression, "There had been not NOUN"

    Can I use both of them?

    And I have two more questions.

    How do you thnik about these sentences : "There are no my books" , "There are no books of mine" , "There are not my books"
    I think that the second and third are well-formed.
    But, I am curious about the availability of the first.


    Lastly, what is the difference in meaning between "There is no my book" and "There are no my books" ?
    For the first part of your question, can you give me an example of what you refer to as "There had not been NOUN" and "There had been not NOUN"?

    For the second part, all three sentences are wrong.
    For the third part, both are wrong.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Questions about "There be" and "had been"

    There had not been a Triple Crown winner 25 years when Secretariat won in 1973.

    You cannot use the version you suggest to transform that sentence..

    You can, however, say "There had been not one word said against the town manager's plan to develop the park into condos until Cole Fallers started speaking out against it. Then the town erupted in a unified bellow of disapproval.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  4. #4
    infiniteone's Avatar
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    Default Re: Questions about "There be" and "had been"

    To bhaisahab

    Thanks for replying my question.
    And Here are the examples.

    1. "There had not been NOUN"

    There had not been proper notification to the public.
    <From 'Joe Nicks - ‎Nov 12, 2009‎'>

    2. "There had been not NOUN"

    There had been not a single documented sighting of the species in the area since 1940.
    <From 'Examiner.com - ‎Oct 21, 2009‎'>

    And, Cuould I modify my question?

    In the second question. I added the word 'here' to the sentences.

    "There are no my books here." , "There are not my books here." "There are no books of mine."

    And In the third question.

    What is the difference in meaning between "There was no human being on earth." and "There were no human beings on earth."

    Thanks for reading this.

  5. #5
    infiniteone's Avatar
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    Default Re: Questions about "There be" and "had been"

    To Barb_D



    Thanks for replying my question.

    But I have a little difficulty understanding your answer.

    Do you mean there is difference between two usages?

  6. #6
    bhaisahab's Avatar
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    Default Re: Questions about "There be" and "had been"

    Quote Originally Posted by infiniteone View Post
    To bhaisahab

    Thanks for replying my question.
    And Here are the examples.

    1. "There had not been NOUN"

    There had not been proper notification to the public.
    <From 'Joe Nicks - ‎Nov 12, 2009‎'>

    2. "There had been not NOUN"

    There had been not a single documented sighting of the species in the area since 1940.
    <From 'Examiner.com - ‎Oct 21, 2009‎'>

    And, Cuould I modify my question?

    In the second question. I added the word 'here' to the sentences.

    "There are no my books here." , "There are not my books here." "There are no books of mine."

    And In the third question.

    What is the difference in meaning between "There was no human being on earth." and "There were no human beings on earth."

    Thanks for reading this.
    1. "There had not been NOUN"

    There had not been proper notification to the public. This is correct.
    <From 'Joe Nicks - ‎Nov 12, 2009‎'>

    2. "There had been not NOUN"

    There had been not a single documented sighting of the species in the area since 1940. This is correct.
    <From 'Examiner.com - ‎Oct 21, 2009‎'>

    Both sentences are correct, but you couldn't use "had been not" in sentence 1.
    And, Cuould I modify my question?

    In the second question. I added the word 'here' to the sentences.

    "There are none of my books here." , "There are not any of my books here." "There are no books of mine here."

    And In the third question.

    What is the difference in meaning between "There was no human being on earth." and "There were no human beings on earth."

    The meanings are the same, the first is more emphatic.

  7. #7
    infiniteone's Avatar
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    Default Re: Questions about "There be" and "had been"

    To bhaisahab

    Thank you very much for answering my question.

    Could I ask you one more question?

    What's the reason I can't use "had been not" in sentence 1 ?

    Is there any difference between "had not been" and " had been not" ?

    Thanks for reading this.
    Last edited by infiniteone; 14-Nov-2009 at 20:07. Reason: to add nickname

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