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Thread: Taking leave?

  1. #1
    Anonymous Guest

    Default Taking leave?

    Hello teachers. I'd like to know how to say when emailing my company that I'm taking leave. What should I put in the subject field, first of all? Should it be something like "My dates of leave" or "My dates of vacation"? or is there any better way to say?

    And should the text go something like this? "I am taking leave on Sep. 9 and 10.", "I am taking Sep. 9 and 10 off.", or "I am taking a vacation on Sep. 9 and 10."? What's the best way to say it?

    Thank you!

    Catie

  2. #2
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
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    Default

    I would say, "I am taking a vacation", and I would put in the subject area My Vacation Dates. The BE speakers here might have slightly different opinions.

    :wink:

  3. #3
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    Catie,

    I think all your suggestions are perfectly acceptable. Native speakers naturally use a variety of ways to express the same thing. I don't see any particular example being better than another.

    As regards British speakers, we normally use the word 'holiday' instead of 'vacation'. I think US English has borrowed the word from Spanish. And I just like to add that almost 100% of US language is understood by British speakers, and frequently US terminology is accepted in the UK.

    For example, about 100 years ago the US and UK used the word 'mad' differently. In the UK it meant 'crazy', whereas in the US it came to mean 'angry' as well. Both these meanings are now accepted by British speakers now.

    Iain

  4. #4
    catie Guest

    Default Dear RonBee

    Thank you for your kind help! :D





    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    I would say, "I am taking a vacation", and I would put in the subject area My Vacation Dates. The BE speakers here might have slightly different opinions.

    :wink:

  5. #5
    catie Guest

    Default Dear dduck

    Thank you for your kind help! :D







    Quote Originally Posted by dduck
    Catie,

    I think all your suggestions are perfectly acceptable. Native speakers naturally use a variety of ways to express the same thing. I don't see any particular example being better than another.

    As regards British speakers, we normally use the word 'holiday' instead of 'vacation'. I think US English has borrowed the word from Spanish. And I just like to add that almost 100% of US language is understood by British speakers, and frequently US terminology is accepted in the UK.

    For example, about 100 years ago the US and UK used the word 'mad' differently. In the UK it meant 'crazy', whereas in the US it came to mean 'angry' as well. Both these meanings are now accepted by British speakers now.

    Iain

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