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  1. #1
    Tan Elaine is offline Key Member
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    Default as (in) your boss

    If someone in your office (as in your boss) wants his or her title capitalized in all situations, then do so.

    Is the 'in' needed or incorrectly inserted?

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: as (in) your boss

    In that case, yes, it's needed.

    Other ways to say this:

    If someone in your office (i.e., your boss)
    If someone in your office (that is, your boss)
    If someone in your office (by which I mean/refer to your boss)
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. #3
    Tan Elaine is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: as (in) your boss

    Thanks, Barb.

    The examples provided by you each contain 1 'in'. However, the sentence I quoted contains 2 "in's". Does that make a difference whether the second 'in' is unnecessary?

    If someone in your office (as in your boss) wants his or her title capitalized in all situations, then do so.

    Thanks again.

  4. #4
    Barb_D's Avatar
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    Default Re: as (in) your boss

    Yes, the "as in" phrase has nothing to do with the other "in" in the sentence.

    The rewrites are all different ways of expressing the same general idea of "as in."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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