Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    165
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default she's gotta have VS she gotta have

    Hi,

    a) She's gotta have a lollipop in her mouth
    b) She gotta have a lollipop in her mouth
    c) She must have a lollipop in her mouth

    Which one is correct?
    Last edited by thx0110; 03-Dec-2009 at 14:06.

  2. #2
    crclee is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    41
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: she's gotta have VS she gotta have

    Quote Originally Posted by thx0110 View Post
    Hi,

    a) She's gotta have a lollipop in her mouth
    b) She gotta have a lollipop in her mouth

    Which one is correct?
    Um, neither. Or both. It depends on the situation.

    In standard English, as you know, "gotta" is notta correct. It's a slangy abbreviation for "got to" that is often used to denote casual or spoken English. In addition, "got + infinitive" is used after "has", so sentence B has a second error because there is an infinitive but no "has".

    The correct form of sentence A in standard English would be as follows: She has got to have a lollipop in her mouth.

    In non-standard English, however, both sentences might be used (or more likely heard). You might see or hear this type of usage in any of the following contexts:

    • a novel
    • a comic book
    • a song
    • a movie

    I hope this helps.

    By the way, why does she need a lollipop in her mouth? I'm intrigued.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    165
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: she's gotta have VS she gotta have

    Quote Originally Posted by crclee View Post
    Um, neither. Or both. It depends on the situation.

    In standard English, as you know, "gotta" is notta correct. It's a slangy abbreviation for "got to" that is often used to denote casual or spoken English. In addition, "got + infinitive" is used after "has", so sentence B has a second error because there is an infinitive but no "has".

    The correct form of sentence A in standard English would be as follows: She has got to have a lollipop in her mouth.

    In non-standard English, however, both sentences might be used (or more likely heard). You might see or hear this type of usage in any of the following contexts:

    • a novel
    • a comic book
    • a song
    • a movie

    I hope this helps.

    By the way, why does she need a lollipop in her mouth? I'm intrigued.
    Thx... because...check PM

    hmm it's sad I can not send you a private message.

    Yes, it will be used in my song. I got all the lyrics, but I don't want to post it here.

    Please, could you set in your profile something like "allow to acccept a PM", just for an hour or so, I will send you the lyrics.
    Last edited by thx0110; 03-Dec-2009 at 14:31.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    165
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: she's gotta have VS she gotta have

    Anyway, what's wrong with "she's gotta have" ?

    for instance here ->

    She's Gotta Have It - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    I think that "she's gotta have" is just the abbreviation of "she has got to have". Or?

  5. #5
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    21,670
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: she's gotta have VS she gotta have

    Quote Originally Posted by thx0110 View Post
    Anyway, what's wrong with "she's gotta have" ?

    for instance here ->

    She's Gotta Have It - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    I think that "she's gotta have" is just the abbreviation of "she has got to have". Or?
    It is appalling English, but I suppose it's acceptable in a song, why not, "she has to have".

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    165
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: she's gotta have VS she gotta have

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    It is appalling English, but I suppose it's acceptable in a song, why not, "she has to have".
    Yes, "she has to have" is also good, I will see. Anyway, thanks for your advice.

  7. #7
    Orestiada is offline Newbie
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • Dutch
      • Home Country:
      • Netherlands
      • Current Location:
      • Greece
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    2
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: she's gotta have VS she gotta have

    Be careful with gotta, this is not correct English, of course it is widely used in spoken English but when you're writing an essay or sitting for an exam I wouldn't advice you to use it.

    Jose Louwes

Similar Threads

  1. n everyday conversation, I've gotta go or I gotta go?
    By laporco in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 12-Nov-2009, 01:59
  2. [General] Meaning of she's all verbs
    By colorblindjunkee in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 28-Aug-2009, 19:25
  3. if she's been able to type
    By joham in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 05-Dec-2008, 09:08
  4. Just gotta do this
    By KLPNO in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 28-Dec-2007, 01:52
  5. got = have got? gotta = have got to?
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 26-Feb-2003, 17:23

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Hotchalk