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  1. M56
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    #1

    "In how much time have you to do the homework?"

    Is this sentence correct?

    "In how much time have you to do the homework?"

  2. tuangpi's Avatar

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    #2

    Re: "In how much time have you to do the homework?"

    The sentence sounds weird to me.


    I think you know the answer.

  3. M56
    Guest
    #3

    Re: "In how much time have you to do the homework?"

    Quote Originally Posted by tuangpi
    The sentence sounds weird to me.


    I think you know the answer.
    No, I don't, Tuangpi. In the beginning I had no problem with it, but then some users criticised its syntax and meaning. Sure, the meaning can be ambiguous out of context - for, example, is "have" in the possessive form or is it the obligatory "have to do", but in context I think it would carry.

    It's now been around many forums and the result is that even native speakers are divided regarding the validity of the sentence.

    Here it works for me:

    Student 1: Damn! That was the teacher calling. I have to do the homework after all.

    Student 2: Bad news. In how much time?


    So why do posters say it isn't grammatical in the form below?

    Re: "In how much time have you to do the homework?"


  4. tuangpi's Avatar

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    #4

    Re: "In how much time have you to do the homework?"

    To me, the sentence sounds weird, simply because I didn't hear such a question (structure) before.

    I'd normally say:

    #1. How much time do you have for the homework? OR

    #2. How much time have you got (to do) for the homework?


  5. Steven D's Avatar

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    #5

    Re: "In how much time have you to do the homework?"

    You've got to ask yourself this: Is this something that someone would really say?

    Is this sentence - structure - something that would be said often? Does it sound like a common manner of expression given the ordinariness of the meaning that it conveys?

    I doubt it.

    This, however, is something that someone would really say and is more likely to say: How much time do you have to do the homework?

    Here are some other possibilities:

    How much time do you have to do it?

    How much time do you have?

    When you do have to finish it by?

    When do you have to finish it?

    When does it have to be done?

    When do you have to get it done?

    How long do you have to do it?



    In how much time? - This is a possible short answer, but "In how much time have you to do the homework?" sounds awkward or clumsy at best. Never mind about its grammatical correctness. That's neither here nor there.

    The same goes for the following sentence: "In how much time have you got to do the homework?"

    I wouldn't recommend it as a good or applicable manner of expression here or there.

    Here are some other things you have to ask yourself: Am I going to tell ESL/EFL speakers to use this sentence? Is it practical? Is it good learning material? Is it worth it?

    I say "no" to those questions.
    Last edited by Steven D; 19-Mar-2005 at 06:32.

  6. tuangpi's Avatar

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    #6

    Re: "In how much time have you to do the homework?"

    Quote Originally Posted by M56
    No, I don't, Tuangpi. In the beginning I had no problem with it, but then some users criticised its syntax and meaning. Sure, the meaning can be ambiguous out of context - for, example, is "have" in the possessive form or is it the obligatory "have to do", but in context I think it would carry.

    It's now been around many forums and the result is that even native speakers are divided regarding the validity of the sentence.

    Here it works for me:

    Student 1: Damn! That was the teacher calling. I have to do the homework after all.

    Student 2: Bad news. In how much time?


    So why do posters say it isn't grammatical in the form below?

    Re: "In how much time have you to do the homework?"

    Why can't you simply ask like this:

    Student 2: Bad news. How much time is left for you?

    Student 1: 20 minutes. But I am not sure if I am gonna finish it in 20 minutes.


    I know you've your reason why you think the sentence you posted is correct. But it could also work in other ways, couldn't they?

    • Member Info
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    #7

    Re: "In how much time have you to do the homework?"

    It sounds better to me with the preposition at the end.

  7. Steven D's Avatar

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    #8

    Re: "In how much time have you to do the homework?"

    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    It sounds better to me with the preposition at the end.

    I thought of that, but I wasn't into it.

  8. M56
    Guest
    #9

    Re: "In how much time have you to do the homework?"

    Quote Originally Posted by X Mode
    You've got to ask yourself this: Is this something that someone would really say?

    Is this sentence - structure - something that would be said often? Does it sound like a common manner of expression given the ordinariness of the meaning that it conveys?

    I doubt it.

    This, however, is something that someone would really say and is more likely to say: How much time do you have to do the homework?

    Here are some other possibilities:

    How much time do you have to do it?

    How much time do you have?

    When you do have to finish it by?

    When do you have to finish it?

    When does it have to be done?

    When do you have to get it done?

    How long do you have to do it?



    In how much time? - This is a possible short answer, but "In how much time have you to do the homework?" sounds awkward or clumsy at best. Never mind about its grammatical correctness. That's neither here nor there.

    The same goes for the following sentence: "In how much time have you got to do the homework?"

    I wouldn't recommend it as a good or applicable manner of expression here or there.

    Here are some other things you have to ask yourself: Am I going to tell ESL/EFL speakers to use this sentence? Is it practical? Is it good learning material? Is it worth it?

    I say "no" to those questions.
    Well, I'm not anywhere suggesting teaching it to ESL students, but I am interested in it as a piece of formal language. I'll ask myself all the other questions you posed. Thanks.

  9. Steven D's Avatar

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    #10

    Re: "In how much time have you to do the homework?"

    I wouldn't use it in formal language either. It simply sounds like too much - like clumsy, or awkward.

    I suppose the grammatical form itself could work in another sentence. I'm not prepared to think of an example just yet, however.

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