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    #1

    a few collocations of "jolt"

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentences?

    It was a jolt to her pride.
    She received a jolt.
    Melanie experienced a jolt of surprise.
    Her defeat was quite a jolt to her.
    jolt (n) = shock
    The door closed with a jolt.
    jolt (n) = a sudden jarring impact
    She was finally jolted out of her depression.
    jolt (v) = to disturb suddenly and severely; stupefy as with the emotional impact of an experience
    jolt out of her depression = pull out of her depression
    He was jolted out of his composure.
    jolt out of his composure = to put him out of countenance
    She took a few jolts of whiskey.
    jolt = mouthful, gulp
    The bus jolted along.
    jolt (v) = move or cause to move with a sudden jerky motion
    The basket was jolted out of the cart.
    jolt out of the cart= shake out of the cart, tumble down of the cart
    The journey has jolt down my meat.
    jolt down my meat= digest my meat due the road shocks
    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.

  1. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: a few collocations of "jolt"

    Most of your examples are common English usage, with the exception of

    She took a few jolts of whiskey.
    The journey has jolt down my meat.


    In your first example above, it would be more common in AmE to say "She took a few shots of whiskey."
    ("Jolt" is never used to refer to mouthfuls or gulps in AmE.)

    I can't think of an appropriate colloquialism for your second example, but I do know that "jolt" would never be used in such a context.

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    #3

    Exclamation Re: a few collocations of "jolt"

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentences?

    It was a jolt to her pride.
    She received a jolt.
    Melanie experienced a jolt of surprise.
    Her defeat was quite a jolt to her.
    jolt (n) = shock
    The door closed with a jolt.
    jolt (n) = a sudden jarring impact
    She was finally jolted out of her depression.
    jolt (v) = to disturb suddenly and severely; stupefy as with the emotional impact of an experience
    jolt out of her depression = pull out of her depression
    He was jolted out of his composure.
    jolt out of his composure = to put him out of countenance
    She took a few jolts of whiskey.
    jolt = mouthful, gulp
    The bus jolted along. Or The bus jolted its passengers as it moved on the rocky road.
    jolt (v) = move or cause to move with a sudden jerky motion
    The basket was jolted out of the cart.
    jolt out of the cart= shake out of the cart, tumble down of the cart
    The journey has jolt down my meat. I think. the implied meaning can be expressed this way:
    The journey on the rough road jolted the meet in my stomach to digest early.
    jolt down my meat= digest my meat due the road shocks
    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    Just a couple of sggestions.

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