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Thread: towards


    • Join Date: Apr 2009
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    #1

    towards

    When I'm hearing American English, different people seem to pronounce the word "towards" different ways. I'd like to know if that is a region-based difference and if so, what is the pronunciation in the different regions.

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    #2

    Re: towards

    I"m sure there is a lot of regional variation. The way I say it rhymes with "boards" but sometimes there is a bit more of the W.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.


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    #3

    Re: towards

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    I"m sure there is a lot of regional variation. The way I say it rhymes with "boards" but sometimes there is a bit more of the W.
    Thanks, so I'm assuming that the way you pronounce it is the common way to pronounce it in Pennsylvania?

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    #4

    Re: towards

    /tɔɚds/

    Note that /w/ drops.

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    #5

    Re: towards

    I grew up in New York, but not the city. It was commonly said that way there. I couldn't really say how they say it here. I'll have to listen more.

    (If you want a word with a lot of variation, look at "drawer." I say it as one syllable, droor. I've hear others say it as "draw" and others have enough of the "er" sound at the end that it sounds like "draw-er" or "droor-er.")
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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