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    • Join Date: Feb 2009
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    #1

    asking for clarification.

    The first sentence arouses my concern, although I have decided to provide the whole context that may be essential when decoding the meaning of the sentence:

    "These are not boasts the prime minister will be allowed to forget between now and election day. George Osborne, the shadow chancellor, twisted the knife in a speech in the City that mocked Brown for his claim that Britain was "better placed" than its rivals to ride out the economic storm."

    How should it be understood?
    1) He won't be allowed to forget the boasts.
    2) He will be allowed to forget boasts but (not what happened in the City).

    Initially I opted for the first one but then withdrew as I thought it was a relative clause with an omitted 'that' relative pronoun: These are not boasts (that) the prime minister will be allowed to forget between now and election day.

    I appreciate any comments. Thank you.


    • Join Date: Nov 2009
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    #2

    Re: asking for clarification.

    Quote Originally Posted by sirapple View Post
    The first sentence arouses my concern, although I have decided to provide the whole context that may be essential when decoding the meaning of the sentence:

    "These are not boasts the prime minister will be allowed to forget between now and election day. George Osborne, the shadow chancellor, twisted the knife in a speech in the City that mocked Brown for his claim that Britain was "better placed" than its rivals to ride out the economic storm."

    How should it be understood?
    1) He won't be allowed to forget the boasts.
    2) He will be allowed to forget boasts but (not what happened in the City).

    Initially I opted for the first one but then withdrew as I thought it was a relative clause with an omitted 'that' relative pronoun: These are not boasts (that) the prime minister will be allowed to forget between now and election day.

    I appreciate any comments. Thank you.
    Hi!

    The sentence, "These are not boasts (that) the prime minister will be allowed to forget between now and election day.", seems to mean what you suggest. Change it from passive form into an active one and you can see that it makes itself clear: These boasts will not allow the prime minister to forget about them between now and election day.

    The word whose place and the meaning are incomprehensible to me is the possessive "its" in the next sentence: "George Osborne, the shadow chancellor, twisted the knife in a speech in the City that mocked Brown for his claim that Britain was "better placed" than its rivals to ride out the economic storm."

    I'd understand it if there were his rivals instead of the "its rivals" in the sentence.

    PS: May be, but may be' the possessive "its" concerns the Labour Party that is thought by PM Brown as better placed than Tories in coping with economic storm.


    • Join Date: Feb 2009
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    #3

    Re: asking for clarification.

    Quote Originally Posted by omasta View Post
    Hi!

    The word whose place and the meaning are incomprehensible to me is the possessive "its" in the next sentence: "George Osborne, the shadow chancellor, twisted the knife in a speech in the City that mocked Brown for his claim that Britain was "better placed" than its rivals to ride out the economic storm."

    I'd understand it if there were his rivals instead of the "its rivals" in the sentence.
    The possessive 'its' refers to Britain, its ;) economic rivals: France, Japan and the USA as the article explains earlier. The use of possessive here is correct.
    Thanks for your response anyway. :)


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
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    #4

    Re: asking for clarification.

    Quote Originally Posted by omasta View Post
    Hi!

    The sentence, "These are not boasts (that) the prime minister will be allowed to forget between now and election day.", seems to mean what you suggest. Change it from passive form into an active one and you can see that it makes itself clear: These boasts will not allow the prime minister to forget about them between now and election day.
    A better change is "The Prime Minister will not be allowed to forget these boasts between now and [the eventual] Election Day".

    Your original interpretation was correct.

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