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  1. #1
    kisop is offline Newbie
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    Default comparative superlative

    since the beginning of our education period, We have learned the terms one syllable or two , three syllable adjectives.can you please tell me how we syllable the adjectives?

    for instance we use tall taller , beautiful more beautiful. I think we say tall in one breath and we use the latter in more breath.but there are also other adjectives. funny , pretty , angry or happy. supposed that this is the first time I have heard these word , how can I undertsand that they are one or more syllable ??

  2. #2
    jlinger is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: comparative superlative

    Each sound is a syllable.

    Turkey is two sounds: Tur and Key. Syllable is three syllables: Syl and Uh and Bull. Syl-Uh-Bull.

    Words of one syllable (big, fat, tall) usually form their comparative and superlatives by adding -er and -est (bigger, biggest, fatter, fattest, taller, tallest). Notice how the single final consonant is doubled, in order to keep the short sound of the vowel. If we didn't double the t in fat (fatter) it would be spelled fater sound like "fate-er."

    Words of three or more syllables (grandiose, incredible, wonderful) always form their comparatives with more or most (more grandiose, most grandiose, etc.)

    Words of two syllables (pretty, happy, simple) are usually optional. More simple = simpler; most pretty = prettiest. Either works.

    There are exceptions. Some one-syllable words (huge comes to mind) can't be huger or hugest; only more huge and most huge will work.

    And some two-syllable words (graceful comes to mind here) are not optional. Only more graceful, not gracefuller, is accepted.

  3. #3
    kisop is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: comparative superlative

    [QUOTE=jlinger;545614]Each sound is a syllable.

    Turkey is two sounds: Tur and Key. Syllable is three syllables: Syl and Uh and Bull. Syl-Uh-Bull.

    thats the point I want to learn, can you please syllable the words below like the upper one.

    cheap , noisy , quiet , clean , small , healty , modern , dirty ???

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    jlinger is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: comparative superlative

    cheap , noi-sy , qui-et , clean , small , healty [is not a word] , mod-ern , dir-ty.

    You can find any word broken into syllables in most any dictionary. For example, from Dictionary.com:

    mod⋅ern  [mod-ern]

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    Nannou is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: comparative superlative

    [QUOTE=kisop;545757]
    Quote Originally Posted by jlinger View Post
    Each sound is a syllable.

    Turkey is two sounds: Tur and Key. Syllable is three syllables: Syl and Uh and Bull. Syl-Uh-Bull.

    thats the point I want to learn, can you please syllable the words below like the upper one.

    cheap , noisy , quiet , clean , small , healty , modern , dirty ???
    One-syllable words: cheap , quiet , clean , small ,

    Two-syllable words; mo-dern , dir-ty noi-sy , heal-ty ,

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    Default Re: comparative superlative

    I guess I understood your question pretty differnet than others did..if you're asking about syllabling the words it's about the vowels evey syllable has one vowel like tall it's one syllable becuase it has only one vowel but beautiful is three syllables because it has more than one vowel and that's in pronuciation not in spelling if you're getting me..

  7. #7
    kisop is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: comparative superlative

    Quote Originally Posted by nada salman View Post
    I guess I understood your question pretty differnet than others did..if you're asking about syllabling the words it's about the vowels evey syllable has one vowel like tall it's one syllable becuase it has only one vowel but beautiful is three syllables because it has more than one vowel and that's in pronuciation not in spelling if you're getting me..
    yes thats right. you are the one who understood me best however I have some hesitations ; you say one vowel = one syllable two wowels= two syllabes and it is not in spelling it is in pronunciation.as in cheap , although there are two wovels "e - a " we say chip so we use it as one syllable. I got it thank you. but , while I am pronunciating " clean" I feel I say "kı - leen" once you explain it I have no other question about the matter.

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    jlinger is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: comparative superlative

    Many times vowels are used in combinations to create different, single, sounds. Clean is an example of this. The ea combination is NOT two separate sounds, but one long E sound. And it's not Cl - leen, but one sound only: KLEEN. Same with Cheap: CHEEP - one long E sound.

    I should have mentioned back in the comparative / superlative discussion that two of the most common one-syllable words do NOT follow the -er, -est rule and those are good and bad.

    It is never gooder or goodest, but always better and best; never badder and baddest, but always worse and worst. (Remember, you will still see "badder" and "baddest" in song lyrics and such, but that's for effect only, and the desired effect is usually to show the lack of education of the speaker.)

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    Default Re: comparative superlative

    sorry 4 being late but wal jingler says is right and we don't actually say keleen but kleen that' the right pronunciation for it in that it'll have one syllable not two..hope u got it..

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