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  1. #1
    kl004535 is offline Junior Member
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    Smile Analysis of Objective Complement

    Dear Teachers,

    for example:
    1.
    I saw him steal the wallet.

    the "steal the wallet" is of objective complement and in this case its type is plain-infinitive serving as verb.


    2.
    I would like you to go.

    the "to go" above is of objective complement and in this case its type is to-infinitive serving as noun(direct object). it means it is direct object as well as objective complement for you(indirect object)


    sometimes it is hard to differentiate object complement and object.
    Is there objective complement for indirect object?
    Am I right about my analysis?

    thanks in earnest for your guidance.

    merry christmas
    Last edited by kl004535; 19-Dec-2009 at 14:37.

  2. #2
    TheParser is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: Analysis of Objective Complement

    Quote Originally Posted by kl004535 View Post
    Dear Teachers,

    for example:
    1.
    I saw him steal the wallet.

    the "steal the wallet" is of objective complement and in this case its type is plain-infinitive serving as verb.


    2.
    I would like you to go.

    the "to go" above is of objective complement and in this case its type is to-infinitive serving as noun(direct object). it means it is direct object as well as objective complement for you(indirect object)


    sometimes it is hard to differentiate object complement and object.
    Is there objective complement for indirect object?
    Am I right about my analysis?

    thanks in earnest for your guidance.

    merry christmas
    (NOT a teacher) You have asked an excellent question. Here is some information that may help you: (1) He thought the weather NASTY. Every book agrees that NASTY is an objective complement. (2) He thought the weather TO BE NASTY. Some books say that TO BE NASTY is an objective complement. (3) He thought THE WEATHER TO BE NASTY. Some books say that THE WEATHER TO BE NASTY is the direct object of "thought." Therefore, some teachers would say your sentences should be analyzed like this: (1) I saw HIM STEAL THE WALLET. "Him steal the wallet" is direct object of the verb; (2) I would like YOU TO GO. "You to go" is direct object of verb. According to some books, however, YOUR analysis is ALSO "correct." English grammarians do not agree on how to parse (analyze) a sentence.

  3. #3
    philo2009 is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: Analysis of Objective Complement

    Quote Originally Posted by kl004535 View Post
    Dear Teachers,

    for example:
    1.
    I saw him steal the wallet.

    the "steal the wallet" is of objective complement and in this case its type is plain-infinitive serving as verb.


    2.
    I would like you to go.

    the "to go" above is of objective complement and in this case its type is to-infinitive serving as noun(direct object). it means it is direct object as well as objective complement for you(indirect object)


    sometimes it is hard to differentiate object complement and object.
    Is there objective complement for indirect object?
    Am I right about my analysis?

    thanks in earnest for your guidance.

    merry christmas
    Both can legitimately be considered objective complements, and the infinitive is functionally verbal in each case.

    The second, however, arguably has the greater claim of the two to be regarded as a "true" complement, since its removal would significantly alter the sense/acceptability of the remaining portion.
    Last edited by philo2009; 21-Dec-2009 at 07:27.

  4. #4
    Kondorosi is offline Banned
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    Default Re: Analysis of Objective Complement

    1. I saw him steal the wallet.
    2. I would like you to go.
    ---------

    1.
    I = S
    saw = V
    him = Od
    steal the wallet = Oc (objective complement)

    Philo said it was not a genuine Oc, but I beg to differ. Complements, as their names suggest, completes something. Here, the Oc does not complete syntax, but semantics:
    I did not really see him. I saw ... (him steal the wallet). That is what. OK?

    Objective complements can be either nouns or adjectives. Apparently, we have a VP here. Yes, it is a verbal, a kind of non-finite VP, an infinitive, whose 'to' has been dropped (this is how it is idiomatic). The infinitive is a noun here.

    Second sentence: Let me diagram both sentences. Thus we can see syntax more clearly.



    Look, Philo, what I have done:

    http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/an...tml#post546586


  5. #5
    philo2009 is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: Analysis of Objective Complement

    Philo said it was not a genuine Oc, but I beg to differ.

    What I actually said was simply that the other construction had a technically stronger claim to be called a complement, on the basis of a strictly syntactic definition of the term. (Whether the application of so rigid a delineation is actually desirable - or even practicable - is a point very much open to argument!)

    Essentially, for all normal intents and purposes, it is quite acceptable to label either of the infinitive phrases in question 'complemental'!

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