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  1. #1
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    Default Does pressure mean stress?

    Hi,
    Does 'pressure' mean 'stress' here?
    "I'd like to help out, but I really haven't got time because of pressure of work"?
    Thanks

  2. #2
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: Does pressure mean stress?

    Quote Originally Posted by evening View Post
    Hi,
    Does 'pressure' mean 'stress' here?
    "I'd like to help out, but I really haven't got time because of pressure of work"?
    Thanks
    No, it doesn't, it means that he/she has a lot of work at the moment.

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    Default Re: Does pressure mean stress?

    Hi bhaisahab,
    Thank you for your help.

    Does pressure/stress mean continuous feelings of worry about your work that prevent you from relaxing if they mean the same here?

    'He has headaches from the stress/pressure of work'?

  4. #4
    Linguist__ is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Does pressure mean stress?

    There was already a large post dedicated to this, which I think you were part of...

    http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/as...ease-help.html

    However, to answer your question, pressure/stress are interchangeable in this context, but not because they mean the same thing. The pressure causes the stress, and the stress causes the headache. This is why you could say either pressure or stress cause headaches. However, many more things cause stress than pressure. Pressure (in this sort of context) only refers to time constraints - not having enough time in which to do work. The person could be stressed because of lazy colleagues, marital problems, responsibility, or any number of things.

    In the other thread you were asking if you can interchange them without losing meaning. I would say you do lose meaning:

    "He has headaches from the pressure of work" - the listener would assume that it is because of too much work he has headaches. Pressure could also be pressure from managers/colleagues.

    "He has headaches from the stress of work" - the listener wouldn't be able to assume what the stressors (things that cause stress) are, as it could be anything.

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    Raymott's Avatar
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    Default Re: Does pressure mean stress?

    Quote Originally Posted by Linguist__ View Post
    There was already a large post dedicated to this, which I think you were part of...

    http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/as...ease-help.html
    Yes, I quit that effort on the grounds that I thought the poster was having a lend of me. If not, I hope you can get to the bottom of evening's problem.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Does pressure mean stress?

    Hi Linguist,
    I've got some questions as follows and hope you can help me out:

    1.Does stress mean continuous feelings of worry about your work that prevent you from relaxing in the sentence 'He has headaches from the stress of work' and
    can pressure mean that in other kinds of situations?

    2.Is there any difference in meaning between stress and pressure here:
    The pressure of modern life.
    The stress of modern life.

    Thanks.

  7. #7
    Linguist__ is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Does pressure mean stress?

    I still say the same thing as before; pressure and stress are not synonymous.

    Pressure refers to things such as meeting deadlines, having a large responsibility, having a large list of things to do in a short time. Things of this nature is pressure.

    Pressure cause stress. Stress does not mean those things said above. Stress is what happens as a result of those things. It is worth noting also that not everyone who is under pressure gets stressed. Some people like pressure. Some people say that they only work well when they are under pressure.

    Your question about the meaning of stress in that sentence; yes, that is what stress means. It generally means that in most sentences.

    As for the differences between 'the stress of modern life' and 'the pressure of modern life'. Stress is a negative thing. Pressure can be, but isn't negative by nature.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Does pressure mean stress?

    Quote Originally Posted by Linguist__ View Post
    As for the differences between 'the stress of modern life' and 'the pressure of modern life'. Stress is a negative thing. Pressure can be, but isn't negative by nature.
    Thanks Linguist for your reply.
    Could you explain what you mean by 'negative' here?
    Does stress mean worry which can keep you from relaxing in 'the stress of modern life'?
    Does pressure mean as you said like things such as meeting deadlines, having a large responsibility, having a large list of things to do in a short time, etc in 'the pressure of modern life'?

    Thank you very much

  9. #9
    Linguist__ is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Does pressure mean stress?

    Quote Originally Posted by evening View Post
    Thanks Linguist for your reply.
    Could you explain what you mean by 'negative' here?
    Does stress mean worry which can keep you from relaxing in 'the stress of modern life'?
    Does pressure mean as you said like things such as meeting deadlines, having a large responsibility, having a large list of things to do in a short time, etc in 'the pressure of modern life'?

    Thank you very much
    Negative, meaning that stress is a bad thing. Pressure can be good for some people.

    Stress means being put under physical, mental, or emtional strain. I wouldn't say stress means worry. Again, worrying causes stress.

    'Pressure of modern life' makes me think of things like unemployment, recession, bringing up a family.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Does pressure mean stress?

    Hi Linguist,
    I'm afraid I'm a little confused about 'stress'. Does the term stress in these two sentences mean the same thing?

    He has headaches from the stress of work.
    the stress of modern life.


    Thanks.

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