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  1. #1
    vil is offline VIP Member
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    heart of gold/heart of stone/to take something back/to take something in one's stride

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?

    Im sure that she had a heart of gold.

    a heart of gold = soft-hearted, very kind and good, easily moved by suffering

    To grow old with a heart of stone no, not even sstone, with a heart of tin, a heart of plastic sould one imagine a worse punishment?

    a heart of stone = an antonym of a heart of gold = a very cold and unfeeling nature

    I am afraid there is no taking it back now that everythink has been decided.

    to take something back = to withdraw

    He looked again at the prepossessing shelved of books to be read and understood, and he wondered at his temerity in thinking that this was going to be taken in his stride.

    to take something in ones stride = to do something without effort

    We show temerity in hasty decisions, and the conduct to which they lead.

    temerity = fearless daring

    We show rashness in particular actions, as dictated by sudden impulse.

    rashness = the trait of giving little thought to danger

    It is an exhibition of temerity to approach the verge of a precipice; it is an act of rashness to jump into a river without being able to swim. Temerity, then, is an unreasonable contempt of danger; rashness is a rushing into danger from thoughtlessness or excited feeling.

    It is notorious temerity to pass sentence upon grounds uncapable of evidence.

    He had the temerity to file a grievance.

    The temerity of her behaviour shocked him.

    He had the temerity to propose to the richest girl in the town.

    He had the temerity of reading a secret letter.

    Advantage is a better soldier than rashness.

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.

  2. #2
    sarat_106 is offline Key Member
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    Exclamation Re: heart of gold/heart of stone/to take something back/to take something in one's st

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?
    I’m sure that she had a heart of gold.

    a heart of gold = soft-hearted, very kind and good, easily moved by suffering
    Have a strong mind and a soft heart(golden heart).
    To grow old with a heart of stone – no, not even stone, with a heart of tin, a heart of plastic – should one imagine a worse punishment

    a heart of stone = an antonym of “a heart of gold” = a very cold and unfeeling nature
    Wealth and want equally harden the human heart(unresponsive heart).

    I am afraid there is no taking it back now that everything has been decided.

    to take something back = to withdraw

    He looked again at the prepossessing shelved of books to be read and understood, and he wondered at his temerity in thinking that this was going to be taken in his stride.

    to take something in one’s stride = to do something without effort I think differently.
    His outlook on life is such that problems are to be taken in his stride, but pleasures are to be enjoyed.
    We show temerity in hasty decisions, and the conduct to which they lead.

    temerity = fearless daring (in a negative sence)= Foolhardy disregard of danger; recklessness
    I am surprised that you should have the temerity to interrupt the progress of work.
    We show rashness in particular actions, as dictated by sudden impulse.

    rashness = the trait of giving little thought to danger

    It is an exhibition of temerity to approach the verge of a precipice; it is an act of rashness to jump into a river without being able to swim. Temerity, then, is an unreasonable contempt of danger; rashness is a rushing into danger from thoughtlessness or excited feeling.

    It is notorious temerity to pass sentence upon grounds incapable of evidence.

    He had the temerity to file a grievance.

    The temerity of her behaviour shocked him.

    He had the temerity to propose to the richest girl in the town.

    He had the temerity of reading a secret letter.

    Advantage is a better soldier than rashness.

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    All OK but for the meaning of the phrase :
    She faced a serious problem, but she was able to take it in her stride.
    Last edited by sarat_106; 29-Dec-2009 at 06:24.

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