Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
  1. #1
    Frank Antonson's Avatar
    Frank Antonson is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    1,151
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Brush up your Shakespeare

    How to Reed-Kellogg diagram the "up" in "brush up"?
    Linguist Farmer

  2. #2
    Kondorosi is offline Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    966
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Brush up your Shakespeare

    Hello Frank,

    I consider it a multi-word unit.

    I am going to brush up on my English.

    adverbial complement

    be going to = catenative; semi-modal; multi-word unit


  3. #3
    Frank Antonson's Avatar
    Frank Antonson is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    1,151
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Brush up your Shakespeare

    Thanks, Kondorosi,
    I think you are probably right.
    Linguist Farmer

  4. #4
    Kondorosi is offline Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    966
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Brush up your Shakespeare

    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Antonson View Post
    Thanks, Kondorosi,
    I think you are probably right.
    Linguist Farmer
    How do you differentiate between a phrasal verb and a prepositional verb? How would you convince your students that a particle in question is not an adverb but a preposition, and vica versa?

    In 'brush up on', what is 'up' and 'on'?

  5. #5
    Frank Antonson's Avatar
    Frank Antonson is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    1,151
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Brush up your Shakespeare

    "On" is a preposition. That's easy because "it begins a prepositional phrase."
    "Up" is another matter. H&H point out that many prepositions were originally adverbs and without objects they remain adverbs e.g. "I fell down" vs "I fell down the stairs".
    A comparison to prepositions with verbs in German is probably useful.
    I wonder what Eugene Moutoux does in his sentences. I may check.
    lf

  6. #6
    Kondorosi is offline Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    966
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Brush up your Shakespeare

    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Antonson View Post
    "I fell down" vs "I fell down the stairs".
    I wonder what Eugene Moutoux does in his sentences. I may check.
    lf
    down - Definition of down preposition (LOWER POSITION) from Cambridge Dictionary Online: Free English Dictionary and Thesaurus

    http://dictionary.cambridge.org/defi...3473&dict=CALD

  7. #7
    Frank Antonson's Avatar
    Frank Antonson is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    1,151
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Brush up your Shakespeare

    Wow! That visual Thesaurus is a sight to behold.
    Regarding my students -- I give them an admittedly circular definition for a preposition. I say "A preposition is a word that begins a prepositional phrase", but then I go on to say "and it is on the list". That list of about 50 words, I say, simply must be memorized. A preposition that does not begin a prep phrase, I teach them, is an adverb. These "prepositions/adverbs" that are attached to verbs in my class we would probably simply place as modifiers under the verb.
    Two things to remember: I haven't taught this material for about 15 years and when I did I claimed to teach "Atap_entka." grammar and syntax, i.e. All the AVERAGE person EVER needs to know about...

  8. #8
    Kondorosi is offline Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    966
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Brush up your Shakespeare

    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Antonson View Post
    Wow! That visual Thesaurus is a sight to behold.
    Regarding my students -- I give them an admittedly circular definition for a preposition. I say "A preposition is a word that begins a prepositional phrase", but then I go on to say "and it is on the list". That list of about 50 words, I say, simply must be memorized. A preposition that does not begin a prep phrase, I teach them, is an adverb.
    Therein lies the snag. How do you know, for example, whether it is a prepositional complement after 'on', or it is an adverb in 'I turned on the light'? What methods do you resort to for the particle to reveal its identity?

  9. #9
    Frank Antonson's Avatar
    Frank Antonson is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    1,151
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Brush up your Shakespeare

    I see the snag.
    The diagram would show whether you "turned on" the light, or turned "on the light". You know, presence or absence of a direct object etc.
    I guess that in any case "I turned on the light" has a double meaning and is the material for a pun.

  10. #10
    Kondorosi is offline Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    966
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Brush up your Shakespeare

    I think it is a semi-idiomatic multi verb.

    I turned it right on (= adv.).

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. A Winter's Tale by Shakespeare
    By Abstract Idea in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 21-Oct-2009, 13:56
  2. sharpener vs pencil sharpener; brush vs paintbrush
    By tangelatm in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-Apr-2009, 11:10
  3. Shakespeare?
    By Eway in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 11-Aug-2008, 17:25
  4. brush up
    By sara88 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 24-Jun-2008, 22:00
  5. Shakespeare
    By Lenka in forum Literature
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 20-Jul-2007, 21:18

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Hotchalk