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  1. Frank Antonson's Avatar
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    #1

    Brush up your Shakespeare

    How to Reed-Kellogg diagram the "up" in "brush up"?
    Linguist Farmer


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    #2

    Re: Brush up your Shakespeare

    Hello Frank,

    I consider it a multi-word unit.

    I am going to brush up on my English.

    adverbial complement

    be going to = catenative; semi-modal; multi-word unit


  2. Frank Antonson's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Brush up your Shakespeare

    Thanks, Kondorosi,
    I think you are probably right.
    Linguist Farmer


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    #4

    Re: Brush up your Shakespeare

    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Antonson View Post
    Thanks, Kondorosi,
    I think you are probably right.
    Linguist Farmer
    How do you differentiate between a phrasal verb and a prepositional verb? How would you convince your students that a particle in question is not an adverb but a preposition, and vica versa?

    In 'brush up on', what is 'up' and 'on'?

  3. Frank Antonson's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Brush up your Shakespeare

    "On" is a preposition. That's easy because "it begins a prepositional phrase."
    "Up" is another matter. H&H point out that many prepositions were originally adverbs and without objects they remain adverbs e.g. "I fell down" vs "I fell down the stairs".
    A comparison to prepositions with verbs in German is probably useful.
    I wonder what Eugene Moutoux does in his sentences. I may check.
    lf


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    #6

    Re: Brush up your Shakespeare

    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Antonson View Post
    "I fell down" vs "I fell down the stairs".
    I wonder what Eugene Moutoux does in his sentences. I may check.
    lf
    down - Definition of down preposition (LOWER POSITION) from Cambridge Dictionary Online: Free English Dictionary and Thesaurus

    http://dictionary.cambridge.org/defi...3473&dict=CALD

  4. Frank Antonson's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Brush up your Shakespeare

    Wow! That visual Thesaurus is a sight to behold.
    Regarding my students -- I give them an admittedly circular definition for a preposition. I say "A preposition is a word that begins a prepositional phrase", but then I go on to say "and it is on the list". That list of about 50 words, I say, simply must be memorized. A preposition that does not begin a prep phrase, I teach them, is an adverb. These "prepositions/adverbs" that are attached to verbs in my class we would probably simply place as modifiers under the verb.
    Two things to remember: I haven't taught this material for about 15 years and when I did I claimed to teach "Atap_entka." grammar and syntax, i.e. All the AVERAGE person EVER needs to know about...


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    #8

    Re: Brush up your Shakespeare

    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Antonson View Post
    Wow! That visual Thesaurus is a sight to behold.
    Regarding my students -- I give them an admittedly circular definition for a preposition. I say "A preposition is a word that begins a prepositional phrase", but then I go on to say "and it is on the list". That list of about 50 words, I say, simply must be memorized. A preposition that does not begin a prep phrase, I teach them, is an adverb.
    Therein lies the snag. How do you know, for example, whether it is a prepositional complement after 'on', or it is an adverb in 'I turned on the light'? What methods do you resort to for the particle to reveal its identity?

  5. Frank Antonson's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Brush up your Shakespeare

    I see the snag.
    The diagram would show whether you "turned on" the light, or turned "on the light". You know, presence or absence of a direct object etc.
    I guess that in any case "I turned on the light" has a double meaning and is the material for a pun.


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    #10

    Re: Brush up your Shakespeare

    I think it is a semi-idiomatic multi verb.

    I turned it right on (= adv.).

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