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    #1

    a few connotations of "go off"

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?

    Helen's mother told her not to go off without telling her.

    They went off without saying goodbye.

    go off = to leave; to depart

    The firecracker went off and scared Jack's dog.

    go off = to be fired; explode

    The alarm clock went off at six o'clock and woke the sleeping soldiers.

    The sirens went off at noon.

    go off = to begin to ring or buzz

    The party went off without any trouble.

    go off = to happen.

    The project went off smoothly.

    go off = keep to the expected plan or course of events, succeed

    Bill often goes off half cocked.

    Mr. Jones was thinking about quilting his job, but his wife told him not to go at half cock.

    go off half cocked = to act or speak before getting ready; to do something too soon

    John has gone off the deep end about owning a motorcycle.

    Mike warned his roommate not to go off the deep end and get married.

    Some girls go overboard for handsome movie and television actors.

    go off the deeep end = to act excitedly and without careful thinking = go overboard = show excessive enthusiasm

    This milk seems to have gone off.

    go off = deteriorate in quality

    I would the friends we missed were safely arrived.--Some must go off.

    go off = die

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.

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    #2

    Re: a few connotations of "go off"

    ***NOT A TEACHER*** Great job on those phrasal verbs. There are three sentences, however, that most Americans might question: (1) His wife told him not to go at half cock. (Did you forget the "off"?) (2) Milk has seems to have gone off. No one would understand this. (3) Some must go off. Death is never described like this.

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    #3

    Re: a few connotations of "go off"

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    (2) Milk has seems to have gone off. No one
    would understand this. Why?
    This milk seems to have gone off.

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    #4

    Re: a few connotations of "go off"

    Quote Originally Posted by Offroad View Post
    ***NOT a TEACHER*** Thank you for your note. I have never heard that expression in the area of the United States where I live.

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