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Thread: sling/ fling

  1. #1
    vil is offline VIP Member
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    Default sling/ fling

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?

    The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune.

    sling = an instrument for throwing stones or other missiles, consisting of a short strap with two strings fastened to its ends, or with a string fastened to one end and a light stick to the other

    At one sling of thy victorius arm, well-pleasing Son.

    sling = the act or motion of hurling as with a sling; a throw; figuratively, a stroke

    Stop those boys slinging rocks at the cars.

    sling = throw

    He slung a gun over his shoulder.

    slung = fling, cast over, shoulder (v)

    He had his right arm in a sling.

    sling = bandage to support an injured forearm; consisting of a wide triangular piece of cloth hanging from around the neck

    Tell him to sling his hook.

    sling one’s hook = move off or go away

    You have to sling the old man out of the room.

    sling = eject

    Al sure had his ass in a sling when the boss found out about his juggling the account.

    have one’s ass in a sling = to be in an uncomfortable predicament; to be in the dog-house; to be at a disadvantage

    And crop-full, out of doors he flings.

    fling = to throw one's self in a violent or hasty manner; to rush or spring with violence or haste

    I flung myself into a chair.

    She had flung all her energies into the rebellion.

    He tore off his jacket, went up to Carter, and flung it in his face.

    We are not prepared to fling harsh words at any who do not at this moment agree with us

    She flung her arms round my neck.

    The flowers fling their fragrance around.

    There are a few beeches that fling their cool shade over the grass.

    We have to fling three fresh divisions into the final battle.

    I like to fling myself whole-heartedly into every undertaking.

    fling = throw

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.

  2. #2
    sarat_106 is offline Key Member
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    Exclamation Re: sling/ fling

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?

    The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune. This is a line from William Shakespeare's Hamlet (written about 1600) and a part of the verse is:-
    Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
    The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
    Or to take arms against a sea of troubles
    And, by opposing, end them. To die, to sleep
    I think the line indicates some unusual cause of suffering which has no remedy. Some body may kindly throw light on this.
    sling = an instrument for throwing stones or other missiles, consisting of a short strap with two strings fastened to its ends, or with a string fastened to one end and a light stick to the other

    At one sling of thy victorious arm, well-pleasing Son. Difficult to guess anything

    sling = the act or motion of hurling as with a sling; a throw; figuratively, a stroke

    Stop those boys slinging rocks at the cars. Ok

    sling = throw

    He slung a gun over his shoulder. Ok

    slung = fling, cast over, shoulder (v)

    He had his right arm in a sling. Ok

    sling = bandage to support an injured forearm; consisting of a wide triangular piece of cloth hanging from around the neck

    Tell him to sling his hook. It is an American slang.

    sling one’s hook = move off or go away Ok

    You have to sling the old man out of the room.

    sling = eject sling out (phrasal verb)= to make someone leave a place because he has behaved badly

    Al sure had his ass in a sling when the boss found out about his juggling the account.

    have one’s ass in a sling = to be in an uncomfortable predicament; to be in the dog-house; to be at a disadvantage This is interesting

    And crop-full, out of doors he flings.

    fling = to throw one's self in a violent or hasty manner; to rush or spring with violence or haste

    I flung myself into a chair. Ok

    She had flung all her energies into the rebellion.

    He tore off his jacket, went up to Carter, and flung it in his face.

    We are not prepared to fling harsh words at anyone who do not at this moment agree with us

    She flung her arms round my neck. Ok

    The flowers fling their fragrance around.

    There are a few beeches that fling their cool shade over the grass.

    We have to fling three fresh divisions into the final battle.

    I like to fling myself whole-heartedly into every undertaking.

    fling = throw

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    You already had a post on 'fling' and the new word 'sling' is surely interesting.

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