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Thread: the front

  1. #1
    Encolpius is offline Junior Member
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    Default the front

    Hello, which preposition is correct in this sentence.

    Her son died at the front / on the front / in the front.

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    TheParser is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: the front

    Quote Originally Posted by Encolpius View Post
    Hello, which preposition is correct in this sentence.

    Her son died at the front / on the front / in the front.

    Thanks in advance.
    ***NOT A TEACHER*** I think that most Americans would say "died AT the front." But if you refer to a particular front: he died ON the Western Front. (When you read, you should write down in a notebook how native speakers use those three prepositions. Even native speakers don't always agree on which one is "correct.")

  3. #3
    Linguist__ is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: the front

    Is this an idiom? I've never heard it used in used a way.

    I can think of sentences where each preposition is used with 'front', but they all require something more after - the front X.

    He died at the front door.
    He died on the Western Front - as TheParser gave
    He died in the front room.

    Apologies if this is an idiom I just don't know of.

  4. #4
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: the front

    Yes, it refers to being in a war, in the thick of the hostilities. At the front.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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