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Thread: for travel

  1. #1
    Abstract Idea is offline Key Member
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    Default for travel

    Somewhere in my old memory I think I remember seeing a rule stating that after prepositions verbs should always come in gerund form. However, I have found the following sentences in the internet:

    1) All essential for travel to Beijing.
    2) Visitors may be aware that the USA has changed its entry procedures for travel to the USA under the Visa Waiver Programme.
    3) Five tips for travel to Canada.
    4) Health information for travel to over 200 international destinations.

    5) Revalidation of Expired Visas After Travel to Contiguous Territory.
    6) ... consulting their doctors before and after travel to affected areas.

    7) Thanks for come to Mexico!!!
    8) Student visa required before travel to the UK.

    Are these sentences grammatically correct?
    Could/should one use "for traveling" and "after traveling" and so on?

  2. #2
    Kondorosi is offline Banned
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    Default Re: for travel

    A preposition is usually followed by a so-called prepositional object (unless the preposition is stranded). This can only be realized by a noun. Both 'traveling' (gerund) and 'travel' (noun) are feasible, but I only ever saw the present participle form of 'travel' after prepositions.

    Thanks for come to Mexico.

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    Abstract Idea is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: for travel

    Quote Originally Posted by Kondorosi View Post
    A preposition is usually followed by a so-called prepositional object (unless the preposition is stranded). This can only be realized by a noun. Both 'traveling' (gerund) and 'travel' (noun) are feasible,
    Do you mean in all those examples (except the Mexico one) one could use "traveling" or "travel" interchangeably?

    Quote Originally Posted by Kondorosi View Post
    but I only ever saw the present participle form of 'travel' after prepositions.
    Please forgive me but I couldn't understand you quite well. Do you mean you have never seen the present participle of travel (traveling) after prepositions or the opposite?

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    Kondorosi is offline Banned
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    Default Re: for travel

    Only nouns can follow a preposition. 'travel' may function as a noun. A gerund is a noun.
    In 'Thanks for come to Mexico', 'come' is not a noun.

    What are your conclusions?

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    Abstract Idea is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: for travel

    Quote Originally Posted by Kondorosi View Post
    'travel' may function as a noun. Only nouns can follow a preposition. A gerund is a noun.
    In 'Thanks for come to Mexico', 'come' is not a noun.

    What are your conclusions?
    My main conclusion is that whenever someone tells me that I wrote something wrong after a preposition, I will tell him or her that it is functioning as a noun.
    (I'm kidding)

  6. #6
    Kondorosi is offline Banned
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    Default Re: for travel

    Quote Originally Posted by ymnisky View Post
    I will tell him or her that it is functioning as a noun.
    That is the most convenient defence strategy. I will adopt it too. What would you say in this case: I look after he.?

  7. #7
    kfredson is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: for travel

    Quote Originally Posted by ymnisky View Post
    Somewhere in my old memory I think I remember seeing a rule stating that after prepositions verbs should always come in gerund form. However, I have found the following sentences in the internet:

    1) All essential for travel to Beijing.
    2) Visitors may be aware that the USA has changed its entry procedures for travel to the USA under the Visa Waiver Programme.
    3) Five tips for travel to Canada.
    4) Health information for travel to over 200 international destinations.

    5) Revalidation of Expired Visas After Travel to Contiguous Territory.
    6) ... consulting their doctors before and after travel to affected areas.

    7) Thanks for come to Mexico!!!
    8) Student visa required before travel to the UK.

    Are these sentences grammatically correct?
    Could/should one use "for traveling" and "after traveling" and so on?
    Travel is a noun and works fine in each of these cases. (Come, of course, is not, so it's needs to be turned into the gerund, "coming".) Traveling can be used in each of these situations but for some reason it seems to be used less frequently. Why is this? I am not quite sure, but we would ordinarily say "travel tips" rather than "traveling trips." Travel has become a subject of great interest these days. Perhaps "travel" connotes more of the prepackaged vacation tour that is so popular. "Traveling" seems to be more of a longer-term adventure. And who has time for that these days?

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    sarat_106 is offline Key Member
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    Exclamation Re: for travel

    Quote Originally Posted by ymnisky View Post
    Do you mean in all those examples (except the Mexico one) one could use "traveling" or "travel" interchangeably?


    Please forgive me but I couldn't understand you quite well. Do you mean you have never seen the present participle of travel (traveling) after prepositions or the opposite?
    Here are a few sentences using present participle of travel as adjective of the nouns followed by prepositions.

    This was explained to me by the traveling salesman of the company.
    I have noted the point from the traveling allowance rules.

    The grammatical rule is unambiguous about use preposition which should always be followed by a noun or pronoun. The verbs that follow a preposition functions as a noun but such use should be aimed at keeping the language efficient and clear. Normally any verb followed by preposition ‘to’ used as infinitive is also called a verbal noun but at times ‘ing’ form is found appropriate after some verbs; as:
    I am dedicated to delivering something creative (Not to deliver).
    Last edited by sarat_106; 06-Jan-2010 at 11:27.

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    Default Re: for travel

    In the sentences above, what is the object of the preposition "of"? Is the preposition "of" being followed by a verb?

    I kind of know English.
    We sort of borrowed it.
    She kind of likes me.

  10. #10
    Abstract Idea is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: for travel

    I have checked, the word "about" may be a preposition, an adverb or even an adjective. It is really hard to study English. Well I checked it before presenting the following example to you:

    "David felt as if he were a sheep about to be dipped against his will."

    I was going to present the above example to you and ask what the object of the preposition about was. It seemed that the preposition "about" was not being followed by a noun/pronoun. However, I guess in this example "about" is not a preposition, right? So my question turns to "What is the function of the word 'about' in the example above?"

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