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  1. #1
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    Default He speaks "Button" like "Botton"

    Hi Everybody,

    In the following audio clip, the UK guy pronounced "Button" like "Botton". Honestly, I need to watch the subtitle, then I can understand he was saying "Button"....As you are native speaker, would you misunderstand what he said? By the way, what kind of accent does he have? Thanks.

    Download Button - MP3 Ringtone Button by Button - Free Music Hosting


    WYH

  2. #2
    Linguist__ is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: He speaks "Button" like "Botton"

    Quote Originally Posted by Williamyh View Post
    Hi Everybody,

    In the following audio clip, the UK guy pronounced "Button" like "Botton". Honestly, I need to watch the subtitle, then I can understand he was saying "Button"....As you are native speaker, would you misunderstand what he said? By the way, what kind of accent does he have? Thanks.

    Download Button - MP3 Ringtone Button by Button - Free Music Hosting


    WYH
    The guy would be offended if you said 'the UK guy'! The speaker is Irish, and has a standard Irish accent.

    I assume native speakers who hadn't heard an Irish accent would have to listen more carefully than usual to understand everything fully. It's all about how 'exposed' an accent is. There are many things on tv with Irish accents in the UK, and I know many Irish (and Northern Irish) people who live here so a UK native wouldn't have any trouble with the accent.

    If you wish to become acquainted with the Irish accent, try searching for videos of 'Father Ted'. It was a highly popular tv show in the 90s, and is hilarious! The whole cast is Irish, and you should be able to find a subtitled version on YouTube or something.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: He speaks "Button" like "Botton"

    Quote Originally Posted by Linguist__ View Post
    The guy would be offended if you said 'the UK guy'! The speaker is Irish, and has a standard Irish accent.

    I assume native speakers who hadn't heard an Irish accent would have to listen more carefully than usual to understand everything fully. It's all about how 'exposed' an accent is. There are many things on tv with Irish accents in the UK, and I know many Irish (and Northern Irish) people who live here so a UK native wouldn't have any trouble with the accent.

    If you wish to become acquainted with the Irish accent, try searching for videos of ''. It was a highly popular tv show in the 90s, and is hilarious! The whole cast is Irish, and you should be able to find a subtitled version on YouTube or something.
    Hi Linguist. Thank you for letting me know I shouldn't say "UK guy". Please tell me how I should call "UK guy" in politely way? In the audio clip, do you think he pronounced like "botton".....Also thank you for introducing the Irish tv show...I will get it to watch it....

  4. #4
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: He speaks "Button" like "Botton"

    The Republic of Ireland is an independent nation from the United Kingdom. (The 6 counties of Northern Ireland remain a part of the UK and a site of political violence.)

    A citizen of Ireland is no more a "UK Guy" than I, as an American, am. We both fought for and earned our independence from British rule.

    That is the point.

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    Default Re: He speaks "Button" like "Botton"

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    The Republic of Ireland is an independent nation from the United Kingdom. (The 6 counties of Northern Ireland remain a part of the UK and a site of political violence.)

    A citizen of Ireland is no more a "UK Guy" than I, as an American, am. We both fought for and earned our independence from British rule.

    That is the point.
    I got it...thanks...As you an American, would you have trouble to listen the audio clip when he said "Button" like "Botton"?

  6. #6
    Linguist__ is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: He speaks "Button" like "Botton"

    I would transcribe his 'button' thus:

    [bɵʔ.n]

    Notice that the vowel symbol is not theta (
    θ) but is the 'close-mid central rounded' vowel. See this website to locate this vowel if you do not know of it already (requires Quicktime):

    The International Phonetic Alphabet - Audio Illustrations

    This vowel doesn't occur in standard English, but it would be common in Irish English, as well as Austrailian English and 'Georgie English'. The vowel also occurs as standard in Cantonese, Mongolian, Swedish, and Toda. If that helps!
    *

  7. #7
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    Raymott is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: He speaks "Button" like "Botton"

    Quote Originally Posted by Linguist__ View Post
    I would transcribe his 'button' thus:

    [bɵʔ.n]
    I agree. That's a nice distinction from a schwa.

    Notice that the vowel symbol is not theta (
    θ) but is the 'close-mid central rounded' vowel.
    This vowel sign is not a theta either. It's a barred o (as in Bridget).
    ɵ
    0275
    lsl barred o
    rounded schwa
    R

  8. #8
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: He speaks "Button" like "Botton"

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    The Republic of Ireland is an independent nation from the United Kingdom. (The 6 counties of Northern Ireland remain a part of the UK and a site of political violence.)

    A citizen of Ireland is no more a "UK Guy" than I, as an American, am. We both fought for and earned our independence from British rule.

    That is the point.
    Many NI citizens would also not welcome being called UK guys.

  9. #9
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: He speaks "Button" like "Botton"

    Quote Originally Posted by Williamyh View Post
    I got it...thanks...As you an American, would you have trouble to listen the audio clip when he said "Button" like "Botton"?
    Personally, I would not. But I do watch a lot of British TV, where English, Welsh, Scottish and Irish accents can be heard.

    I do use the subtitles sometimes.

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