Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19
  1. Frank Antonson's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 1,151
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    Diagramming Longfellow

    The news that mentioned earlier to Kondorosi is that there is now an American website dedicated to diagramming. Elizabeth O'Brien administers it.
    Since it's based in the USA, I thought I would go to an American poet, Longfellow. (I think the English appreciate him, however, because I am quite sure that there is a bust of him (or at least a plaque) in Westminster Abbey's poet's corner.
    Here's the website:
    forum.english-grammar-revolution.com • View forum - Sentence Diagramming


    • Join Date: Nov 2009
    • Posts: 966
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: Diagramming Longfellow

    You agree with the "as fast as an ostrich" sentence click here?

    I prefer mine better:



    The first 'as' is an adverb modifying 'fast'; the second 'as' is a conjunction.

  2. Frank Antonson's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 1,151
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: Diagramming Longfellow

    No, I say that "as...as" is a correlative conjunction and both belong on the same line modifying "fast".


    • Join Date: Nov 2009
    • Posts: 966
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: Diagramming Longfellow



    Correlative conjunctions always join grammatically equal elements (e.g., noun & noun, adjective & adjective, phrase & phrase, clause & clause, etc.

    He can run as [fast] as [an ostrich]

    fast = adj.
    an ostrich = noun

    adj. ≠ noun --> as ... as ≠ correlative conjunction


  3. Frank Antonson's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 1,151
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #5

    Re: Diagramming Longfellow

    "As fast as an ostrich can run fast". Two clauses are being joined.


    • Join Date: Nov 2009
    • Posts: 966
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #6

    Re: Diagramming Longfellow

    1. He can run as [fast] as [an ostrich can run].
    2. As [he can run fast] as [an ostrich can run].
    3. As [fast he can run] as [an ostrich can run].

    I think the first 'as' is solely attached to 'fast'.

    This is what you like, right?


  4. Frank Antonson's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 1,151
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #7

    Re: Diagramming Longfellow

    No, I would attach the first "as" to fast.
    Let me diagram it. Give me a minute.

  5. Frank Antonson's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 1,151
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #8

    Re: Diagramming Longfellow



    • Join Date: Nov 2009
    • Posts: 966
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #9

    Re: Diagramming Longfellow



    Again. What are the comparative constituents in the sentence? (adv. & adv.)

    [He can run fast] and [an ostrich can run fast]

    Is the first fast "bigger" or the second? as ... as --> same.



    Your as ... as, Frank, does not appear to be a correlative conjunction, because in your diagram it connects an adverb (fast) to the understood verb (x x) in the subordinate clause. In all modesty, my diagram is superb.

  6. Frank Antonson's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 1,151
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #10

    Re: Diagramming Longfellow

    Yes, once again, you are right, you superb diagrammer.

    The line should have been connected to the second understood "fast" (as you did it). You may not believe this, but I wondered if you would catch that. (Though I did not make the mistake intentionally -- I just thought of it later. )

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Help with diagramming sentences.
    By Zach in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-Oct-2007, 09:16
  2. What is the best Kellogg diagramming software?
    By Chiropotera in forum Teaching English
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 30-Jun-2007, 12:13
  3. help diagramming sentences
    By mchoa5 in forum Analysing and Diagramming Sentences
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 26-May-2006, 07:29
  4. diagramming help
    By jspinney in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 19-Apr-2006, 05:07
  5. diagramming crisis
    By Carla Jenee' in forum Analysing and Diagramming Sentences
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 07-Mar-2006, 00:43

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •