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  1. #1
    M56 Guest

    Default 100 million word British National Corpus.

    http://view.byu.edu/

    BNC remote access.

    Try it out.

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: 100 million word British National Corpus.

    An essential tool, especially since the demise of Cobuild online.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: 100 million word British National Corpus.

    Nice work...thanks heaps. I was just wondering: how are you guys using this corpus? Are you using data from the corpus in the ESL/EFL classroom? Has anyone had any success with the corpus? On initial inspection it seems it could be a useful site; it's probably more useful for more advanced classes...anyhow, ขอบคุนครับ !

  4. #4
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: 100 million word British National Corpus.

    I use concordancers for information, but I find that I have had much more success getting students to use Google for many concordancer type checks, presumably because of familiarity.

  5. #5
    M56 Guest

    Default Re: 100 million word British National Corpus.

    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    I use concordancers for information, but I find that I have had much more success getting students to use Google for many concordancer type checks, presumably because of familiarity.
    Google is good for concordancing, but fails on providing information on register.

    And Google can't do nice little tricks like this (using un-x-ed adjective as a command.

    UNEMPLOYED

    UNEXPECTED

    UNCHANGED

    UNPRECEDENTED

    UNWANTED

    UNLIMITED

    UNIFIED

    UNMARRIED

    UNRELATED

    UNAFFECTED

    UNPUBLISHED

    UNUSED

    UNTOUCHED

    UNSKILLED

    UNNOTICED

    It goes on for as long as one wants. I obtained 500 words.


  6. #6
    M56 Guest

    Default Re: 100 million word British National Corpus.

    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    I use concordancers for information, but I find that I have had much more success getting students to use Google for many concordancer type checks, presumably because of familiarity.
    And this beauty: verb + a/the/some + way.

    FIND A WAY

    GO SOME WAY

    PAVE THE WAY

    LIKE THE WAY

    OPEN THE WAY

    CHANGE THE WAY

    LEAD THE WAY

    FIND SOME WAY

    SEE THE WAY

    AFFECT THE WAY

    KNOW THE WAY

    CLEAR THE WAY

    GO THE WAY

    PREPARE THE WAY

    EXAMINE THE WAY

    POINT THE WAY

    UNDERSTAND THE WAY

    SHOW THE WAY

    FIND THE WAY

    INFLUENCE THE WAY

    It goes to 304 different combinations.

    http://view.byu.edu/

  7. #7
    M56 Guest

    Default Re: 100 million word British National Corpus.

    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    I use concordancers for information, but I find that I have had much more success getting students to use Google for many concordancer type checks, presumably because of familiarity.
    And if you want to find out which adjectives are being used in the tabloids:

    use [aj*] in the search box and highlight w_newsp_tabloid:

    EX-WIGAN

    HUSH-HUSH

    SIX-NIGHT

    SLUMP-HIT

    SHAMED

    TEENY

    BAD-BOY

    ADULTS-ONLY

    MONTJUIC

    BALL-TAMPERING

    K-REG

    POLO-PLAYING

    TOP-SECURITY

    WELL-DRAINED

    17-STONE

    REUNITED

    VINNY

    BOOZY

    BELGIAN-BORN

    ESSEX-BASED

    MIXED-UP

    SPOTTED

    STAR-STRUCK

    SURE-FIRE

    TERMINALLY-ILL

    SUB-TROPICAL

    CORSICAN

    EIGHT-MAN

    HEAD-BUTTED

    LOVE-STRUCK

    MAN-EATING

    MULTI-MILLION-POUND

    http://view.byu.edu/

    Luverly, innit?
    Last edited by M56; 01-Apr-2005 at 18:01.

  8. #8
    Red5 is offline Webmaster, UsingEnglish.com
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    Thumbs up Re: 100 million word British National Corpus.


  9. #9
    M56 Guest

    Default Re: 100 million word British National Corpus.

    Like it!

    There was a question on another forum about the semantic prosody of the expression "set in". The discussions on that expression are mainly about whether it has mainly negative associations or not, i.e. whether is is found collocated with negative cotext and context. A quick search in the BNC with * has set in bring this result as the prime expressions:

    EROSION HAS SET IN

    BOREDOM HAS SET IN

    DECLINE HAS SET IN

    PANIC HAS SET IN

    YOU HAS SET IN

    WEATHER HAS SET IN

    UNISYS HAS SET IN

    THAW HAS SET IN

    THAT HAS SET IN

    TELEKOM HAS SET IN

    SPRING HAS SET IN

    SHE HAS SET IN

    ROUTINE HAS SET IN

    ROT HAS SET IN

    REALLY HAS SET IN

    REALITY HAS SET IN

    HYSTERIA HAS SET IN

    FOSSILIZATION HAS SET IN

    DECAY HAS SET IN

    COLLAPSE HAS SET IN

    DISILLUSIONMENT HAS SET IN

    DISEASE HAS SET IN

    DETERIORATION HAS SET IN

    http://view.byu.edu/

    --------------------
    Surprised.
    Last edited by M56; 31-Mar-2005 at 23:49.

  10. #10
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: 100 million word British National Corpus.

    Quote Originally Posted by M56
    Google is good for concordancing, but fails on providing information on register.

    It has many limitations, but it is a very good way to get people started, and is good for frequency, geography, etc. If people look carefully at the results, they might be able to amalyse register themselves- if it's all fromm business texts, say, then that gives clues. It doesn't offer the clever searches, though.

    www.onelook.com is another handy tool with wildcards for basic things like prefixes and suffixes.

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