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  1. #1
    MasterT Guest

    Default "To gone" or "to done"

    "You just gone and done the dumbest thing in your whole life."

    I know the meaning of the sentence, but shouldn't she just say "You'VE just gone and done..."? And if doesn't mean the same thing, then when should we use that form?

  2. #2
    Tdol is online now Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: "To gone" or "to done"

    It's common to drop the auxiliary verbn like thisin colloquial English, both British and American, though more so in the latter. It's very colloquial, so avoid it in anything formal and exams. Also, many regard this as an uneducated form, so I would suggest that it's better for ESL students to avoid it because many will assume it's an error, or look down on it as a structure.

  3. #3
    MasterT Guest

    Default Re: "To gone" or "to done"

    Thanks, that makes a lot of sense since I heard that in a movie.

  4. #4
    Tdol is online now Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: "To gone" or "to done"

    You'll hear a lot of stuff in movies that won't help you get a job or pass an exam.

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