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  1. #1
    vil is offline VIP Member
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    a few connotations of "run over"

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?

    Billy forgot he had left the water on, and the tub ran over.

    The bathwater is running over!

    Don't fill the kettle too full: it'll run over.

    run over = to be too full and flow over the edge; spill over

    During the lunch hour, Mary ran over her history facts so she would remember them for the test.

    The coach ran over the signals for the trick play with the team just before game time.

    Just run over your notes before the examination.

    run over = to try or go over (something) quickly; practice briefly

    At night cars often run over small animals that are blinded by the headlights.

    If you cross the street in the wrong place you may get run over.

    Slow down, you might run someone over.

    A child was run over at this road junction.

    run over = to drive on top of; ride over;

    There are no buses to Withering on Sundayss but I can easily run you over in the car.

    run you over = take you there in the car

    Will you run over to the shop and get some butter?

    run over = dash across (to)

    Students usually run over with inventiveness.

    The children are running over with energy-I can't keep them still for five minutes.

    run over = be full to overflowing

    We've tried to keep the cost of the repairs in the original sum, but we may run over by a few pounds.

    I've run over the allotted time, but there are still questions.

    run over = go beyond, exceed

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.

  2. #2
    sarat_106 is offline Key Member
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    Exclamation Re: a few connotations of "run over"

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?
    Billy forgot he had left the water on, and the tub ran over.

    The bathwater is running over!

    Don't fill the kettle too full: it'll run over.

    run over = to be too full and flow over the edge; spill over= to overflow

    During the lunch hour, Mary ran over her history facts so she would remember them for the test.

    The coach ran over the signals for the trick play with the team just before game time.

    Just run over your notes before the examination.

    run over = to try or go over (something) quickly; practice briefly= to review/repeat

    At night cars often run over small animals that are blinded by the headlights.

    If you cross the street in the wrong place you may get run over.

    Slow down, you might run someone over.

    A child was run over at this road junction.

    run over = to drive on top of; ride over= to hit and knock down
    She stood by the side oh the road when her pet dog was run over by a car.

    There are no buses to Withering on Sundays but I can easily run you over in the car.

    run you over = take you there in the car =no idea of the use.

    Will you run over to the shop and get some butter?

    run over = dash across (to) no idea of the use

    Students usually run over with inventiveness.

    The children are running over with energy-I can't keep them still for five minutes.

    run over = be full to overflowing

    We've tried to keep the cost of the repairs in the original sum, but we may run over by a few pounds.

    I've run over the allotted time, but there are still questions.

    run over = go beyond, exceed Ok

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    "Run over", the verb and the particle are generally inseparable, even when the object is a pronoun. So please check again about the use of run you over.
    Of course the phrasal verb has another application: To cross by running
    The athletes must run over the bridge to reach the finish line.

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