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  1. #1
    Ever Student's Avatar
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    Lightbulb Aphasics & Jargons

    Some aphasics produce:

    1- Semantic Jargon like "a chair" is called "an engine" by patient. Or using "girl" in stead of "boy" in another semantic verbal aphasis.

    2- Phonemic jargon derived from paraphasia; causes mispronunciation of words, or the production of in approporiate words like being pronounced "sable" for "table".
    3- Neologistic jargon derived from phonemic jargon results in nonsence with possible words.
    4-Global aphasia is a combination of Broca's and Wernicke's aphasia.


    Can you please help me if I am doing wrong?

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    Raymott's Avatar
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    Default Re: Aphasics & Jargons

    Quote Originally Posted by taghavi View Post
    Some aphasics produce:

    1- Semantic Jargon like "a chair" is called "an engine" by patient. Or using "girl" in stead of "boy" in another semantic verbal aphasis.
    2- Phonemic jargon derived from paraphasia; causes mispronunciation of words, or the production of in approporiate words like being pronounced "sable" for "table".
    3- Neologistic jargon derived from phonemic jargon results in nonsence with possible words.
    4-Global aphasia is a combination of Broca's and Wernicke's aphasia.


    Can you please help me if I am doing wrong?
    I don't think you're using the term 'jargon' correctly.
    Do you mean:
    1. Calling a chair 'an engine' is an example of semantic verbal aphasia.
    2. Saying 'sable' for 'table' is an example of phonemic paraphrasia.
    3. Nonsense words can arise from neologistic aphasia.
    (4. is more or less correct.)

    Note: the words in italics derive from yours. They sound right as descriptions, but I haven't come across them as linguistic terms.
    In medicine (neurology, speech pathology) dysphasia is also a proper term, meaning a lesser degree of aphasia.
    1, 2, 3 are examples of expressive aphasia/dysphasia - defects in expression.
    4. also adds receptive aphasia, which describes defects in interpretation, in which the subject might interpret the word "chair" as referring to an engine. That is, receptive aphasia is an input problem, and expressive aphasia is an output problem.

    All of these terms are part of the jargon of linguistics and of neuropathology.

  3. #3
    Ever Student's Avatar
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    Default Re: Aphasics & Jargons

    Hi,
    Thank you for your explanation.Yes, the term "Jargon" is used in "An Inroduction to Language" by Fromkin.

    As you described, 1 can be an example of receptive and expressive and it doesn't differ from 4.

    Do scientists still believe that all problems in production arisen from Broka's aphasia and, on the contrary, problems in comprehension referes to Wernike's aphasia? A couple of mounts ago, I read a text proving that Brocka's and Wernike's areas were not devoted to those problems.

  4. #4
    Raymott's Avatar
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    Default Re: Aphasics & Jargons

    Quote Originally Posted by taghavi View Post
    Do scientists still believe that all problems in production arisen from Broka's aphasia and, on the contrary, problems in comprehension referes to Wernike's aphasia? A couple of mounts ago, I read a text proving that Brocka's and Wernike's areas were not devoted to those problems.
    It's contentious.
    Of course, receptive aphasia can still be called Wernicke's aphasia without it necessarily being caused by problems in 'Wernicke's area' in the brain; same for Broca.

    Broca's area - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Wernicke's area - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    PS: Generally speaking, cognitive scientists these days are far less inclined to attribute any function totally to a specific part of the brain. There is increasing evidence that healthy parts of the brain can sometimes take over from damaged parts which are traditionally thought to perform specific functions.
    Last edited by Raymott; 21-Jan-2010 at 06:11.

  5. #5
    Ever Student's Avatar
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    Default Re: Aphasics & Jargons

    Thank you.

  6. #6
    Linguist__ is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Aphasics & Jargons

    As a student speech therapist I can say that speech therapists no longer refer to Broca's and Wernike's aphasia. Non-fluent and fluent aphasia is used, respectively. If and when speech therapists refer to 'Broca's aphasia' or 'Wernike's aphasia', they are not referring to sites of brain lesions - the person with these aphasias may have unaffected Broca's or Wernike's areas completely. The terms refer to speech characteristics only.

    The reduction in use of 'Broca's aphasia' and 'Wernike's aphasia' reflects the current general consensus that many parts of the brain are used in language. There's no doubt that Broca's and Wernike's areas are hugely important, and damage to these areas will always cause language disorder. However, the brain is structured in a far more complex way, and damage to other areas may create the same apparent disorder, even if these 'language centres' are left unharmed.

  7. #7
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: Aphasics & Jargons

    Quote Originally Posted by taghavi View Post
    Hi,
    Thank you for your explanation.Yes, the term "Jargon" is used in "An Inroduction to Language" by Fromkin.
    Could you give us an example of how they use it, because calling 'chair' semantic jargon also sounds peculiar to me.

  8. #8
    Linguist__ is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Aphasics & Jargons

    Regarding the affect aphasia has on the retrieval of words from the lexicon, I was taught that the following things may happen:


    • Pausing or hesitation
    • Circumlocution
    • Refusing to respond
    • Sematic paraphasia - substitution of a word which is somewhat related, visually or semantically.
    • Unrelated paraphasia - substitution of a word which is unrelated semantically or visually. I would say 'engine' for 'chair' is an unrelated paraphasia.
    • Perseveration - where the client persists to give a response given earlier for all consequent responses.
    • Automatism - a word/phrase innappropriately used, and used compulsively.
    • Indefinate substitution - referring to objects as 'thing'.
    • Phonemic paraphasia - production of a word with the use of a wrong sound. The word is produced with ease, and there is no indication of difficulty in articulation.
    • Articulatory error - defective production of sounds, often leading to resulting in the wrong sound being used, as in phonemic paraphasia. However, the problem is an articulatory one.
    • Neologism - an invented, jargon word from which the listener cannot discern the speaker's meaning.

    So, I would call saying 'engine' for 'chair' an unrelated paraphasia, not the use of a jargon word. A jargon word would be given a picture of a chair and responding [po].

  9. #9
    Raymott's Avatar
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    Default Re: Aphasics & Jargons

    Quote Originally Posted by Linguist__ View Post
    Regarding the effect aphasia has on ...
    Aphasia usually does have an effect on the affect. No doubt it's affected by the extent of the aphasia and effected by the limbic system.

  10. #10
    Ever Student's Avatar
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    Default Re: Aphasics & Jargons

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    Could you give us an example of how they use it, because calling 'chair' semantic jargon also sounds peculiar to me.
    Hi Tdol,

    "Some aphasis produce semantic jargon. one patient, for example, might call "a chair" an engine or a California with the substituted words bearing little semantic relation to the intended word."
    Accordinfg to Fromkin It could be arisen from jargon.

    Dear Linguist and Raymoot tell me what I can do with your describing and Fromkin's one.
    Please give me your hand.

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