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  1. #1
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    Default Pronunciation "Island" and "Ireland"

    Hi Everybody,

    What are the pronunciation difference between "Island" and "Ireland"? If I don't check the phonetics of these two words, I almost can't distinguish the pronunciation of these two words....please advise.

    WYH

  2. #2
    Linguist__ is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Pronunciation "Island" and "Ireland"

    Quote Originally Posted by Williamyh View Post
    Hi Everybody,

    What are the pronunciation difference between "Island" and "Ireland"? If I don't check the phonetics of these two words, I almost can't distinguish the pronunciation of these two words....please advise.

    WYH
    Standard British English - Island /'aɪ.lənd/
    - Ireland /ˈaɪə.lənd/

    There is little difference phonetically, so there will be even less difference in speech. I guess the first syllable of 'Ireland' is a triphthong, so will sound longer than the diphthong in 'island'.

    In my own accent the difference is much greater:

    Island - /'eɪlənd/

    Ireland - /'aɪjərlənd/

    But I would have trouble distinguishing 'island' from 'Ireland' in speech with a standard English English accent.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Pronunciation "Island" and "Ireland"

    Quote Originally Posted by Linguist__ View Post
    Standard British English - Island /'aɪ.lənd/
    - Ireland /ˈaɪə.lənd/

    There is little difference phonetically, so there will be even less difference in speech. I guess the first syllable of 'Ireland' is a triphthong, so will sound longer than the diphthong in 'island'.

    In my own accent the difference is much greater:

    Island - /'eɪlənd/

    Ireland - /'aɪjərlənd/

    But I would have trouble distinguishing 'island' from 'Ireland' in speech with a standard English English accent.
    I see...tks

  4. #4
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    Post Re: Pronunciation "Island" and "Ireland"

    Quote Originally Posted by Linguist__ View Post
    Standard British English - Island /'aɪ.lənd/
    - Ireland /ˈaɪə.lənd/

    There is little difference phonetically, so there will be even less difference in speech. I guess the first syllable of 'Ireland' is a triphthong, so will sound longer than the diphthong in 'island'.

    In my own accent the difference is much greater:

    Island - /'eɪlənd/

    Ireland - /'aɪjərlənd/

    But I would have trouble distinguishing 'island' from 'Ireland' in speech with a standard English English accent.
    Hi Linguist

    I read your reply. I don't still know. What difference between "Standard British - english" and "Standard english - English"
    Plz explain it for me. Thanks in advance

  5. #5
    Linguist__ is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Pronunciation "Island" and "Ireland"

    Quote Originally Posted by phinamdl View Post
    Hi Linguist

    I read your reply. I don't still know. What difference between "Standard British - english" and "Standard english - English"
    Plz explain it for me. Thanks in advance
    There is no real difference. There are another three countries in Britain, however, and each of these countries has their own standard pronunciation.

    I made the distinction because I said 'in my own accent', which would be Standard Scottish English. So, I said Standard English English to differentiate between the two. When people say 'Standard British English' they mean 'Standard English English'.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Pronunciation "Island" and "Ireland"

    Quote Originally Posted by Linguist__ View Post
    There is no real difference. There are another three countries in Britain, however, and each of these countries has their own standard pronunciation.

    I made the distinction because I said 'in my own accent', which would be Standard Scottish English. So, I said Standard English English to differentiate between the two. When people say 'Standard British English' they mean 'Standard English English'.
    thank linguist. ^^! I knew your meaning!

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