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  1. #1
    joham is offline Key Member
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    pick up his health

    The patient was advised to go to the seaside to pick up his health.

    Do native speakers use 'pick up' to mean 'regain'?

    Thank you in advance.

  2. #2
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
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    Re: pick up his health

    We might well say "He has gone to spend a fortnight by the sea to pick up" meaning to improve his health and regain his spirits.

    I do not think I have ever met it as "to pick up his health".

  3. #3
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    Raymott is offline VIP Member
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    Re: pick up his health

    Quote Originally Posted by joham View Post
    The patient was advised to go to the seaside to pick up his health.

    Do native speakers use 'pick up' to mean 'regain'?

    Thank you in advance.
    As Anglika implies, it's not used transitively.
    She was sick for a week, but now she's starting to pick up.

  4. #4
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    Re: pick up his health

    Interesting - not an American use that I've ever heard. I'd be wondering "Pick up what?" in that context.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  5. #5
    joham is offline Key Member
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    Re: pick up his health

    Thank you all very much. Now I've got to understand that in British and Australian English, 'his health' is not needed in this sentence.

    And Barb, did you mean that the 'his health' should be used after 'pick up' in American English? Hope to get further help from you.

  6. #6
    Barb_D's Avatar
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    Re: pick up his health

    The phrase "to pick up" as it is described here is not an American expression.

    She's gone to the airport to pick up her sister. -- Normal
    He went to the store to pick up some milk. -- Normal
    The pace is starting to pick up. -- Get faster (normal)
    Here's a little pick-me-up. -- Something to make you feel better (normal)
    He's gone to the shore to pick up. -- I'd be saying "Pick up what? Pick up who?"

    I like learning these differences.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  7. #7
    joham is offline Key Member
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    Re: pick up his health

    I got it. Thank you again, Barb.

  8. #8
    Linguist__ is offline Senior Member
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    Re: pick up his health

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    The phrase "to pick up" as it is described here is not an American expression.

    She's gone to the airport to pick up her sister. -- Normal
    He went to the store to pick up some milk. -- Normal
    The pace is starting to pick up. -- Get faster (normal)
    Here's a little pick-me-up. -- Something to make you feel better (normal)
    He's gone to the shore to pick up. -- I'd be saying "Pick up what? Pick up who?"

    I like learning these differences.
    (Not a teacher)

    The last one doesn't imply anything about health, to me at least. The sentence Raymott used had 'sick' in the first clause and it was that 'sick' that indicated what 'pick up' meant.

    That doesn't mean it would be correct to say 'He's gone to the shore to pick up his health'. More likely would be 'He's gone to the shore to see if his health picks up.' or 'He's gone to the shore hoping that his health will pick up. Something along those lines.

    'Pick up' doesn't have anything to do with health on it's own, as far as I'm aware, but health can pick up - in a similar way to spirits and pace.

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