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  1. #1
    Dasharik is offline Newbie
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    Default to loan/ lend money

    Hello, is there any difference between 'to lend money' and 'to loan money'?

    As I understand the difference is only in style 'to lend' is more neutral while 'to loan' is more a banking term.

    For example: 'The bank lends/ loans money'.

    Thank you

  2. #2
    2006 is offline Banned
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    Default Re: to loan/ lend money

    Quote Originally Posted by Dasharik View Post
    Hello, is there any difference between 'to lend money' and 'to loan money'?

    As I understand the difference is only in style; 'to lend' is more neutral while 'to loan' is more a banking term.

    For example: 'The bank lends/ loans money'.

    Thank you
    "loan" is mostly a noun. 'I am trying to get a loan from the bank.' I wouldn't use "loan" as a verb.

    "lend" is the commonly used verb, even in banking. 'I hope the bank will lend me some money.'

  3. #3
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: to loan/ lend money

    You might find this interesting. It's from Dictionary and Thesaurus - Merriam-Webster Online

    usage The verb loan is one of the words English settlers brought to America and continued to use after it had died out in Britain. Its use was soon noticed by British visitors and somewhat later by the New England literati, who considered it a bit provincial. It was flatly declared wrong in 1870 by a popular commentator, who based his objection on etymology. A later scholar showed that the commentator was ignorant of Old English and thus unsound in his objection, but by then it was too late, as the condemnation had been picked up by many other commentators. Although a surprising number of critics still voice objections, loan is entirely standard as a verb. You should note that it is used only literally; lend is the verb used for figurative expressions, such as “lending a hand” or “lending enchantment.”
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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