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Thread: Rebajas

  1. #1
    ratóncolorao is offline Member
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    Default Rebajas

    Could someone tell me if there exits any word, expression, etc to make a special reference to that period of the year when customers may buy goods -specially clothes- much cheaper than during the rest of the time? Are there also goods "on sale" ?, meaning by that they got reduced prices.
    Here in Spain we have twice a year that kind of opportunity.

    Thank you for your help.

  2. #2
    mmasny is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: Rebajas

    I would use one of these: sale season, end of the season, end-of-season sales, after-season sales, post-season sales.

  3. #3
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is online now Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: Rebajas

    If you're looking for a closer equivalent, the word 'reduction' is sometimes used in this context: 'There are some great reductions in our end-of-season sale'. But often, shops prefer more graphic language: ALL PRICES SLASHED.

    b

  4. #4
    mmasny is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: Rebajas

    By the way, it should be especially clothes I think. Am I right?

  5. #5
    Linguist__ is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Rebajas

    Quote Originally Posted by mmasny View Post
    By the way, it should be especially clothes I think. Am I right?
    (Not a teacher)

    I think specially and especially are completely interchangeable. I think the confusion arises from people using 'special' more than 'especial', but 'especially' more than 'specially'. As such, 'specially' has come to be used as meaning 'specifically', but this is somewhat idiomatic.

  6. #6
    mara_ce's Avatar
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    Default Re: Rebajas

    Quote Originally Posted by mmasny View Post
    By the way, it should be especially clothes I think. Am I right?
    Yes, I agree with you.
    Specially and especially seem similar but have a different meaning and are easily confused.
    e.g.
    This book was specially written for foreign students. (for a particular reason)
    I love Paris, especially in the Spring. (above all)

  7. #7
    BobK's Avatar
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    Default Re: Rebajas

    Quote Originally Posted by mmasny View Post
    By the way, it should be especially clothes I think. Am I right?
    Well spotted

    This is possibly related to ratóncolorado's accent. When I was in Spain (España) selling - among other things - a magazine called Motor Sport (an English title) I had to learn to give it 4 syllables. I haven't heard him/her, but it's quite likely that 'specially' and 'especially' sound the same.

    That's one explanation. Another is that with the influence of hispanic pronunciation in certain parts of the US, the difference between the two words has been eroded (spreading to the UK by way of TV/film/Internet - 'the usual suspects'.

    b

  8. #8
    mmasny is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: Rebajas

    Especially or Specially?
    That's what they say: "Most of the time there is little or no difference between the words especially and specially. " So I think Linguist is right.

  9. #9
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  10. #10
    Linguist__ is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Rebajas

    Quote Originally Posted by mara_ce View Post
    (Not a teacher)

    I thought that 'specially' used as 'specifically', which it is in those examples, was an idiomatic use. 'Specially' is the adverb of 'special'. 'Especially' is the adverb of 'especial'. To me there is no difference between 'special' and 'especial' except that 'especial' is rarely used.

    If I had to discern a meaning, I would say 'especial' and 'especially' are more emphatic.

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