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  1. #1
    thedaffodils's Avatar
    thedaffodils is offline Key Member
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    Default Bloodless orange

    Hello!

    I read an article titled Bloodless Orange about Ukrain from The Economist. Here's the URL link.
    <Ukraine: Bloodless orange | The Economist>

    Why did the journalist use "Orange" in the title? Is there any connotation in English about orange, except for the colour?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: Bloodless orange

    The pro-Western movement in the Ukraine is associated with the colour orange- there was the 'orange revolution'. The Economist doesn't think that this movement has achieved much, so it is a bloodless (lifeless) orange, contrasting it with the fruit the blood orange.

    To keep the fruit theme running, they have also referred to Yushchenko and Tymoshenko as 'lemons'- in British English (I don't know about other variants), a lemon is someone who's useless, inept or an idiot.

    BTW, The Economist is very fond of such puns in its headlines and in the captions for photographs. However, they tend to avoid doing this much in the articles themselves.

  3. #3
    thedaffodils's Avatar
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    Default Re: Bloodless orange

    Thank you very much for your help.

    Could you comment why The Economist tends not to play words much in their its articles? Is istn't fun to read pun?

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