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  1. #1
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    Default Sunny-Side Up, Sunny-Side Down

    Hi Everybody,

    "sunny-side up" and "sunny-side down" are American English? If I am in the hotel, any other terms to express these? In UK, how do I express them in British English? Thanks.

    WYH

  2. #2
    buggles's Avatar
    buggles is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: Sunny-Side Up, Sunny-Side Down

    Quote Originally Posted by Williamyh View Post
    Hi Everybody,

    "sunny-side up" and "sunny-side down" are American English? If I am in the hotel, any other terms to express these? In UK, how do I express them in British English? Thanks.

    WYH
    This is pretty much a personal view, but I don't think this comes up in the UK.
    Everyone I know, has fried eggs yolk up, nobody has them yolk down, so in a hotel there's never a choice: eggs are always yolk up. That means we have no alternatives to sunny side up/down because we never need them.

    buggles (not a teacher)

  3. #3
    Searching for language is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Sunny-Side Up, Sunny-Side Down

    In Canada and the US, yolk up is "sunny side up"
    "over easy" means that the egg has been flipped over, so the yolk is down.
    "over hard" generally means that the egg has been flipped over, and is cooked so that the yolk is not runny any more.

    I run a bed and breakfast, so I have done many of them in all different ways!

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Sunny-Side Up, Sunny-Side Down

    Quote Originally Posted by Williamyh View Post
    Hi Everybody,

    "sunny-side up" and "sunny-side down" are American English? If I am in the hotel, any other terms to express these? In UK, how do I express them in British English? Thanks.

    WYH

    I googled the types of Fried egg and got the following information and would like to share them to you all.

    North America

    North Americans use many different terms to describe fried eggs, including:

    • A style known simply as 'fried' — eggs are fried on both sides with the yolks broken until set or hard.
    • 'Over well', also called 'over hard' or 'hard' — cooked on both sides until the yolk has solidified.
    • 'Over medium' — cooked on both sides; the yolk is of medium consistency and the egg white is thoroughly cooked.
    • 'Over easy', also called 'over light or runny' — cooked on both sides; the yolk is a thin liquid, while the egg white is partially cooked. "Over easy" fried eggs are also commonly referred to as dippy eggs or dip eggs by Marylanders and by Pennsylvania Dutch persons living in southern Pennsylvania, mainly due to the practice of dipping toast into the yolk while eating.
    • 'Sunny side up' — cooked only on one side; yolk is liquid; the egg white is often still a bit runny as well. This is often known simply as 'eggs up'. Gently splashing the hot cooking oil or fat on the sunny side uncooked white, i.e., basting, may be done to thoroughly cook the white. Covering the frying pan with a lid during cooking (optionally adding a cover and half-teaspoon of water just before finishing) allows for a less "runny" egg, and is an alternate method to flipping for cooking an egg over easy (this is occasionally called 'sunny side down').
    Last edited by Williamyh; 25-Feb-2010 at 03:47.

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