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  1. #1
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    Default relative pronoun

    Hello.

    I'm Mah. This is my first time asking you a question.

    "But without housemaids we've seen you winding up doing lots of things it doesn't make sense for you to be doing at all."

    This is a line somebody said in one breath.

    Q1. When you write it down, is it better to add a comma after "housemaids"?

    Q2. I would understand it easier if I could replace "it doesn't make..." with "that doesn't make...."
    Could you explain why it is okay for "it" to be there?
    (One of my study buddies says "which" is hidden between "things" and "it" and another says it is "of which.")

  2. #2
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    Default Re: relative pronoun

    Welcome, Mah.

    The sentence is awkward, isn't it. I, too, am having a problem understanding it. It would sound more natural to say,

    "But even without a maid we've seen you doing a lot of things that don't make sense for you to be doing at all / that you shouldn't be doing anyway."

    "But even without a maid we've seen you wound up, doing a lot of things that don't make sense for you to be doing at all / that you shouldn't be doing anyway." ("wound up" functions as an adjective, and it means, tense)

    "But even without a maid you wind up doing a lot of things that don't make sense for you to be doing at all / that you shouldn't be doing anyway." ("wind up" functions as a transitive verb, and means, end up doing something)

    Note, placing a comma before and after "even without a maid" wouldn't hurt the sentence.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: relative pronoun

    Hello Casiopea

    Thank you for your kind response. I like your three examples much better.

    I now have a new question.
    "Wound up" in your second sentence is blinking in yellow signal to my eyes. I've learned that a verb "see" takes either an infinitive or a present participle. I'm not sure if that is right, but if it is, it should be "we've seen you wind up" shouldn't it? Can you please clear this up for me?

    Mah

  4. #4
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    Default Re: relative pronoun

    [2] . . . we have seen you wound up, . . . .

    "have seen" is the main verb. Note the structure:

    see X do Y (infintive verb)
    see X in a state of Y (adjective)

  5. #5
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    Default Re: relative pronoun

    For example,

    A. We have seen you wind the clock. (infintive, transitive verb)
    B. We have seen you wound up. (adjective)

    Test: Insert the verb BE.
    You are wound up, tense.

    Test: Replace "wound up" with another adjective
    You are tired.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: relative pronoun

    Thank you, Casiopea.
    Now I can see the difference between "wind up" and "wound up." I will be careful not to make the same mistake again. Many thanks to your kindness.
    Mah

  7. #7
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    Default Re: relative pronoun

    You're welcome. :D

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