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    • Join Date: Feb 2010
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    #1

    help needed to critique short food article please and thank you

    Please see below a short article intended for my food blog, I'd appreciate some feedback on grammar and structure. Many thanks
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    Most people say that beauty is only skin deep, and I agree, to a certain extent. Food for example can be very beautiful to look at, but taste dreadful; too much or not enough seasoning can make all the difference. Other times, food might look drab and grey, but when you take a mouthful, the taste is sublime.



    Below is a montage of Thursday’s Connoisseurs meal. All three dishes looked great, tasted great, and smelled great.


    PHOTO


    Next, we have a montage of Friday’s Formal Hall. After the momentous effort of Thursday’s Connoisseurs Dinner, Friday’s Formal needed to be ‘low maintenance’. With this in mind, we chose to serve soup, roast beef, and quince. Nice and easy, but not overly exciting.


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    The two sets of photographs are very different. Thursday’s food was very pretty and complex, whilst Friday’s offering was much simpler and plain. However, which meal was the real beauty pageant winner?

    PHOTO


    Take Friday’s soup for instance, nothing speaks British more than the garden pea. When correctly made pea soup is wonderful, especially on a cold winter’s day, full of wholesome, fresh, and vibrant flavour. Good soup always makes me feel like I’m eating something inherently healthy and good for my body.

    PHOTO


    And what about the Sunday roast dinner? Well-made Yorkshire puddings, crisp potatoes, and rich gravy smoothed on slices of rare roast beef! Few meals can be as memorable as a good Sunday roast with family and friends.


    PHOTO


    Now let us take a minute to look at the quince. In seventeenth century English cookery books there were more recipes for quince than any other orchard fruit. In recent times, the quince has fallen out of favour, replaced by our taste for everything apple and pear. Once, the humble quince was prized throughout Western Asia, and the seeds were carried, tenderly, to Europe and across the oceans to the New World. On Friday we resurrected the humble quince and gave it centre stage next to homemade chestnut ice cream.



    In summary, Thursday’s food was, without a doubt, beautiful, modern, stylish and very well presented. However, Friday’s food, if you happen to look beneath the skin, held a bigger beauty, one based on tradition and not style.



    Last edited by dav1d; 01-Mar-2010 at 11:27.

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    #2

    Re: help needed to critique short food article please and thank you

    Everything sounds fine to me, but I have a question. What do you do with the quince? I have a huge bush which gives me a lot of quince every fall. The only thing that I/ve ever done with them is to make jelly.

    I am in the Bed and breakfast business, and my guests really enjoy the delicate flavour of the quince, but I would like to do something else with them. I have not had much luck in finding recipes for them. Send me the link to your blog in a private message if you don't want to post it here.

    I am not a teacher.


    • Join Date: Feb 2010
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    #3

    Re: help needed to critique short food article please and thank you

    Thank you both for your comments. We poach our quince in much the same way you would apple or pear. We used a recipe from Pier by Greg Doyle. Pier is a very famous seafood restaurant in Sydney.

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