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  1. #91
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    Default Re: Cross-linguistic Morpheme Analysis

    About 'absorb':

    Thank you for your accuracy.
    Just one question: can 'absorb' be used as an independent morpheme in Polish? If so, what part of speech is it?

  2. #92
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    Default Re: Cross-linguistic Morpheme Analysis

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    My contribution consists in being a native Polish speaker only... Chester seems a great specialist to me. I've been reading this thread now and I can see that you're also a great linguist. It's an honour for me that I can be having this conversation with you, being just a regular language user!
    Clearly, you're a good translator!
    And, considering the structure of Polish and the knowledge a Pole accumulates in her life, I believe Poles can make great linguists.

  3. #93
    birdeen's call is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: Cross-linguistic Morpheme Analysis

    Quote Originally Posted by chester_100 View Post
    About 'absorb':

    Thank you for your accuracy.
    Just one question: can 'absorb' be used as an independent morpheme in Polish? If so, what part of speech is it?
    No, it can't! The noun is "absorpcja" (absorption) or "absorbowanie" (absorbing - gerund), the present adjectival participle is "absorbujący" (absorbing - adjectival participle). (This is weird! I was taught participles were still verbs, but there's no "-owa-" part here!). And so on. "Absorb" isn't a Polish word.
    Last edited by birdeen's call; 15-Aug-2010 at 00:45.

  4. #94
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    Default Re: Cross-linguistic Morpheme Analysis

    How about this one? It contains 'owa' and 'c'. But surely 'awanse' is an independent word.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails awa.JPG  

  5. #95
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    Default Re: Cross-linguistic Morpheme Analysis

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    No, it can't! The noun is "absorpcja" (absorption) or "absorbowanie" (absorbing - gerund), the present adjectival participle is "absorbujący" (absorbing - adjectival participle). (This is weird! I was taught participles were still verbs, but there's no "-owa-" part here!). And so on. "Absorb" isn't a Polish word.
    Thank you!
    That's why I didn't risk counting it as a Polish morpheme. Apparently, it's Latin.

  6. #96
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    Default Re: Cross-linguistic Morpheme Analysis

    Quote Originally Posted by chester_100 View Post
    How about this one? It contains 'owa' and 'c'. But surely 'awanse' is an independent word.
    That's exactly how I feel this word!

    "Awans" without "e" at the end of it is an independent word (a noun) in Polish. "Awanse" is one (a little dated but used) of two possible plural forms. The other is "awansy".

  7. #97
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    Default Re: Cross-linguistic Morpheme Analysis

    Quote Originally Posted by chester_100 View Post
    Thank you!
    That's why I didn't risk counting it as a Polish morpheme. Apparently, it's Latin.
    But if it isn't a morpheme in Polish, then what is it? "-owa-" is most certainly a Polish morpheme; it exists in very many verbs! So is "-ć". Then what about the remaining "absorb-"? It has a meaning so I think it is a morpheme...?

    PS: We have many roots in Polish that aren't words themselves! They often need affixes to become words!
    Last edited by birdeen's call; 15-Aug-2010 at 01:12.

  8. #98
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    Default Re: Cross-linguistic Morpheme Analysis

    Please keep this up! I am loving reading it -- understanding little, but loving it.

    Well, let me TRY to make a contribution. Polish is an Indo-European language. I was once told (by a Lithuanian) that Lithuanian was the oldest of the Indo-European languages. I also suspect that Icelandic actually IS very old in its structure. When I studied linguistics, I remember running into the term "the decay of the cases". How many cases are in Polish? I think linguists believe that there were seven in Indo-European. Each case, I think, can make at least one (maybe more) preposition redundant. E.g. "the boy's" vs "of the boy" in English.

    If what I have just written makes no sense, please forgive me. I had ONE linguistic course in college -- loved it, but was intimidated.

  9. #99
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    Default Re: Cross-linguistic Morpheme Analysis

    You know, we can't separate the morphemes of the Latin absorbere in English, because English only accepts absorb.
    Similarly, the word cannot be analyzable in other languages.

    In Polish, it can be acceptable only if it's a Polish affix with which you can form other words too.

  10. #100
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    Default Re: Cross-linguistic Morpheme Analysis

    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Antonson View Post
    Please keep this up! I am loving reading it -- understanding little, but loving it.

    Well, let me TRY to make a contribution. Polish is an Indo-European language. I was once told (by a Lithuanian) that Lithuanian was the oldest of the Indo-European languages. I also suspect that Icelandic actually IS very old in its structure. When I studied linguistics, I remember running into the term "the decay of the cases". How many cases are in Polish? I think linguists believe that there were seven in Indo-European. Each case, I think, can make at least one (maybe more) preposition redundant. E.g. "the boy's" vs "of the boy" in English.

    If what I have just written makes no sense, please forgive me. I had ONE linguistic course in college -- loved it, but was intimidated.
    I think it makes very much sense!!

    I think the Proto-Indo-European language is believed to have had eight cases. I'm pretty sure it's not seven, because Polish has seven cases and I know we have lost at least one. Generally, Baltic languages (Latvian is another one) are archaic I think. They have changed least in comparison to other Indo-European languages. But Slavic languages, I heard, are also quite archaic, and quite similar to Baltic ones. I heard the researchers say there must have been some Balto-Slavic stage. I don't know much about it. I was always curious about the history of my language and that's what I learned.

    It may be interesting for you that there was such a thing as the "dual grammatical number" in addition to the singular and the plural! I think it still exists in Lithuanian or Latvian, but I know it because there are some remainings of it in Polish too!!

    PS: As for making prepositions redundant, we simply don't use prepositions everywhere you use them! We won't say "of the boy". We don't even have a word for "of"! We will say "the boy's". We won't say, "He killed him with a sword." We don't have a word for "with" (when it is used like this). We use the instrumental case!
    Last edited by birdeen's call; 15-Aug-2010 at 01:44.

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