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  1. #1
    Anonymous Guest

    Default Rhetorical Mode/shift

    I was wondering what a good definition would be for the term "rhetorical shift" and also the term "rhetorical mode" thanks!

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    When someone is in 'rhetorical mode' they are speaking in a way similar to someone speaking publicy. It usually means that they are being rather pompous and sentencious.

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    RonBee's Avatar
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    Isn't that tendentious?

    :wink:

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    Here is some valuable information about "rhetorical shift" and "rhetorical mode": http://forums.delphiforums.com/dicti...es?msg=14948.2

    Put simply, a rhetorical shift is a shift in rhetoric from one area to another. A Google search produced 505 mentions of "rhetorical shift". Go to: http://ms101.mysearch.com/jsp/GGmain...rical+shift%22

    rhetorical shift: A change from one tone, attitude, etc. Look for key words like but, however, even though, although, yet, etc.
    http://www.enlightenedenglish.com/LitTermsPg.htm

    rhetorical shift: http://ms101.mysearch.com/jsp/GGmain...%2b+definition

    Here is a definition of "rhetorical mode": http://www.hn.psu.edu/Faculty/KKemmerer/rhet.html (That website also gives examples of the different rhetorical modes.)

    Rhetorical Modes: http://www.cdc.net/~stifler/en110/modes.html

    rhetorical mode: http://ms101.mysearch.com/jsp/GGmain...archBtn=Search

    :)

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