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    #1

    start from scratch/tearing your hair out/sweep away/day-to-day/order take out/invade

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?

    Joseph Sherlock, a small-business management consultant based near Portland, Oregon, says companies that start from scratch often struggle with this phenomenon when they reach $1 to $2 million in sales.

    start from scratch = from the very beginning, from the outset; from nothing

    That's a good threshold to start tearing your hair out.

    tearing your hair out = if someone is tearing their hair out, they are extremely worried or agitated about something

    Management issues take up more of your time, leaving less time for you to develop new products or services.

    take up = use up or occupy entirely

    At both thresholds, business owners must take time to consider their desires and goals, to avoid being swept away by the demands of running their companies.

    sweep away = engross; overwhelm emotionally

    Of course, you must be serious about giving up control of day-to-day operations.

    day-to-day = occurring on a routine or daily basis

    At the end of the day, all of the ideas go up on the wall.

    go up on the wall = make public

    I would like to propose a toast to my kid sister.

    to propose a toast = to raise up a glass of champagne at a meal and say kind words about somebody

    How amazing! One day you order take out, and it changes your life.

    order take out = ask a restaurant for food to be eaten elsewhere (usually at home)

    It took several years before everything worked like clockwork in that department.

    to work like clockwork = to work well or efficiently

    Is he busy? Not really, he’s out on the deck.

    on the deck = available, ready for action

    You are on the air!

    on the air = to be in the process of being broadcast over TV or radio

    I don’t want to invade your privacy.

    invade = to intrude upon, infringe, encroach on, violate

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.

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    #2

    Exclamation Re: start from scratch/tearing your hair out/sweep away/day-to-day/order take out/inv

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?
    I was so upset, I almost went up the wall. We went up the wall waiting for you.

    Of course, you must be serious about giving up control over day-to-day operations.

    day-to-day = occurring on a routine or daily basis

    At the end of the day, all of the ideas go up on the wall.

    go up on the wall = make public (I am not sure, but go up the wall is used both as literally and idiomatically)
    Go up the wall = to exhibit great frustration
    We went up the wall waiting for you.

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    I think use of control over is more common than control of in such situations.
    The police has complete control over the situation.
    He has a greater control over his mind.

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